I’m Gonna Live Till I Die ~ Frank Sinatra

Francis Albert “Frank” Sinatra was an American singer and film actor.

Beginning his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra became an unprecedentedly successful solo artist from the early to mid-1940s, after being signed to Columbia Records in 1943. Being the idol of the “bobby soxers”, he released his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946. His professional career had stalled by the 1950s, but it was reborn in 1953 after he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity.

He signed with Capitol Records in 1953 and released several critically lauded albums (such as In the Wee Small Hours, Songs for Swingin’ Lovers, Come Fly with Me, Only the Lonely and Nice ‘n’ Easy). Sinatra left Capitol to found his own record label, Reprise Records in 1961 (finding success with albums such as Ring-a-Ding-Ding!, Sinatra at the Sands and Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim), toured internationally, was a founding member of the Rat Pack and fraternized with celebrities and statesmen, including John F. Kennedy. Sinatra turned 50 in 1965, recorded the retrospective September of My Years, starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, and scored hits with “Strangers in the Night” and “My Way”.

With sales of his music dwindling and after appearing in several poorly received films, Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971. Two years later, however, he came out of retirement and in 1973 recorded several albums, scoring a Top 40 hit with “(Theme From) New York, New York” in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally, until a short time before his death in 1998.

Sinatra also forged a highly successful career as a film actor, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity, a nomination for Best Actor for The Man with the Golden Arm, and critical acclaim for his performance in The Manchurian Candidate. He also starred in such musicals as High Society, Pal Joey, Guys and Dolls and On the Town. Sinatra was honored at the Kennedy Center Honors in 1983 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1997. Sinatra was also the recipient of eleven Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Trustees Award, Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

I’m Gonna Live Till I Die

I’m Gonna Live Till I Die” is a song Frank Sinatra recorded under and Capitol Records.

While the song was released in 1955 as a Capitol single, the song was casually recorded in concert by Sinatra throughout some of his last years under Columbia Records.

Sinatra’s studio version of the song was done with an arrangement by Dick Reynolds in 1954. This recording was released as a single in 1955 with the song “Melody of Love” as the A-side. Neither of these songs charted, however.

I’m Gonna Live Till I Die - Kent, Curtis, Hoffman

I’m gonna live till I die
I’m gonna laugh ‘stead of cry
I’m gonna take the town turn it upside down
I’m gonna live, live, live until I die

They’re gonna say what a guy
I’m gonna play for the sky
Ain’t gonna miss a thing,gonna have my fling
I’m gonna live live live until I die

Those blues I lay low, I’ll make them stay low
They’ll never trail over my head
I’ll be a devil till I’m an angel
But until then Hallelujah
Gonna dance gonna fly
I’ll take my chance riding high
Before my numbers up I’m gonna fill my cup
I’m gonna live, live, live until I die

Those blues I lay low, I’ll make them stay low
They’ll never trail over my head
I’ll be a devil till I’m an angel
But until then Hallelujah
Gonna dance gonna fly
I’ll take my chance riding high
Before my numbers up I’m gonna fill my cup
I’m gonna live, live, live, live until I die

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The Weight ~ The Band

The_Band_(1969)The Band was a Canadian-American roots rock group that originally consisted of Rick Danko (bass guitar, double bass, fiddle, trombone, vocals), Levon Helm (drums, mandolin, guitar, vocals), Garth Hudson (keyboard instruments, saxophones, trumpet), Richard Manuel (piano, drums, baritone saxophone, vocals) and Robbie Robertson (guitar, vocals). The members of the Band first came together as they joined rockabilly singer Ronnie Hawkins’ backing group the Hawks one by one between 1958 and 1963.

In 1964, they separated from Hawkins, after which they toured and released a few singles as Levon and the Hawks and the Canadian Squires. The next year, Bob Dylan hired them for his U.S. tour in 1965 and world tour in 1966. Following the 1966 tour, the group moved with Dylan to Saugerties, New York, where they made the informal 1967 recordings that became The Basement Tapes, which forged the basis for their 1968 debut album Music from Big Pink. Because they were always “the band” to various front men, Helm said the name “The Band” worked well when the group came into its own. The group began performing officially as The Band in 1968, and went on to release ten studio albums. Dylan continued to collaborate with The Band over the course of their career, including a joint 1974 tour.

The original configuration of The Band ended its touring career in 1976 with an elaborate live ballroom performance featuring numerous musical celebrities. This performance was immortalized in Martin Scorsese’s 1978 documentary The Last Waltz. The Band recommenced touring in 1983 without guitarist Robbie Robertson, who had found success with a solo career and as a Hollywood music producer. Following a 1986 show, Richard Manuel was found dead of suicide, but the remaining three members continued to tour and record albums with a revolving door of musicians filling Manuel’s and Robertson’s respective roles, before finally settling on Richard Bell, Randy Ciarlante, and Jim Weider. Danko died of heart failure in 1999, after which the group broke up for good. Levon Helm was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1998, and after a series of treatments was able to regain use of his voice. He continued to perform and released several successful albums until he succumbed to the disease in 2012.

The group was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1989 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked them No. 50 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, and in 2008, they received the Grammy’s Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2004, “The Weight” was ranked the 41st best song of all time in Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

The Weight

The Weight” is a song originally by the Canadian-American group The Band that was released as Capitol Records single 2269 in 1968 and on the group’s debut album Music from Big Pink. Written by Band member Robbie Robertson, the song is about a visitor’s experiences in a town mentioned in the lyric’s first line as Nazareth, from which the Scottish band Nazareth later took its name. “The Weight” has significantly influenced American popular music, having been listed as #41 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time published in 2004.  Pitchfork Media named it the 13th best song of the Sixties,  and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame named it one of the 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. PBS, which broadcast performances of the song in “Ramble at the Ryman” (2011), “Austin City Limits” (2012),  and “Quick Hits” (2012), describes it as “a masterpiece of Biblical allusions, enigmatic lines and iconic characters” and notes its enduring popularity as “an essential part of the American songbook.”

“The Weight” is one of The Band’s best known songs though it was not a significant mainstream hit for group in the U.S., peaking at only #63. The Band’s recording fared much better in Canada and the UK - in those countries, the single was a top 40 hit, peaking at #35 in Canada and #21 in the UK in 1968. However, the song’s popularity was greatly enhanced by three cover releases in 1968 and 1969 with arrangements that appealed to a diversity of music audiences. Aretha Franklin’s 1969 soul music arrangement was included in her This Girl’s in Love with You album, which peaked in the U.S. at #19 and #3 on the soul chart, and peaked in Canada at #12.  Jackie DeShannon’s 1968 pop music arrangement, debuting on the Hot 100 one week before The Band’s, peaked at #55 in the U.S., #35 in Canada. A joint single rhythm and blues arrangement released by Diana Ross & the Supremes and The Temptations in 1969, hit #46 in the U.S., and #36 in Canada. The Band’s and Jackie DeShannon’s versions never mentioned the title.

The inspiration for and influences affecting the composition of “The Weight” came from the music of the American South, the life experiences of band members, particularly Levon Helm, and movies of Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel. The original members of The Band performed “The Weight” as an American Southern folk song with country music(vocals, guitars and drums) and gospel music (piano and organ) elements. The lyrics,  written in the first-person, are about a traveler’s experiences arriving, visiting, and departing a town called Nazareth. The singers, led by Helm, vocalize the traveler’s encounters with people in the town from the perspective of a Bible Belt American Southerner,  like Helm himself, a native of rural Arkansas. After Helm’s death in 2012, Robertson, who was raised in Canada, described how visits to the Memphis, Tennessee area, around which Helm grew up, affected him and influenced his songwriting:

“To me … going there was like going to the source. Because I was at such a vulnerable age then, it made a really big impact on me. Just that I had the honor joining up with this group and then even going to this place, which was close to a religious experience – even being able to put my feet on the ground there, because I was from Canada, right? So it was like, ‘Woah, this is where this music grows in the ground, and [flows from] the Mississippi river. My goodness.’ It very much affected my songwriting and, because I knew Levon’s musicality so well, I wanted to write songs that I thought he could sing better than anybody in the world.

“While I was there, I was just gathering images and names, and ideas and rhythms, and I was storing all of these things … in my mind somewhere. And when it was time to sit down and write songs, when I reached into the attic to see what I was gonna write about, that’s what was there. I just felt a strong passion toward the discovery of going there, and it opened my eyes, and all my senses were overwhelmed by the feeling of that place. When I sat down to write songs, that’s all I could think of at the time.”

The colorful characters in “The Weight” were based on real people members of The Band knew, as Levon Helm explained in his autobiography, This Wheel’s on Fire. In particular, “young Anna Lee” mentioned in the third verse is Helm’s longtime friend Anna Lee Amsden,  and, according to her, “Carmen” and “Crazy Chester” were people from Helm’s hometown, Turkey Scratch, Arkansas.

According to Robertson, “The Weight” was inspired by the movies of Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel. Buñuel’s films are known for their surreal imagery and criticism of organized religion, particularly Catholicism. The song’s lyrics and music invoke vivid imagery, the main character’s perspective is influenced by the Bible, and the episodic story was inspired by the predicaments Buñuel’s film characters faced that undermined their goals for maintaining or improving their moral character. Of this, Robertson once stated:

“(Buñuel) did so many films on the impossibility of sainthood. People trying to be good in Viridiana and Nazarin, people trying to do their thing. In “The Weight” it’s the same thing. People like Buñuel would make films that had these religious connotations to them but it wasn’t necessarily a religious meaning. In Buñuel there were these people trying to be good and it’s impossible to be good. In “The Weight” it was this very simple thing. Someone says, “Listen, would you do me this favor? When you get there will you say ‘hello’ to somebody or will you give somebody this or will you pick up one of these for me? Oh? You’re going to Nazareth, that’s where the Martin guitar factory is. Do me a favor when you’re there.” This is what it’s all about. So the guy goes and one thing leads to another and it’s like “Holy shit, what’s this turned into? I’ve only come here to say ‘hello’ for somebody and I’ve got myself in this incredible predicament.” It was very Buñuelish to me at the time.”

The traveler’s visit to Nazareth

The traveler begins “The Weight” by giving the impression that he is visiting the Holy Land. The traveler is weary from his long journey (e.g., “feelin’ ’bout half past dead”), and is looking for a place to stay and sleep, as in the New TestamentGospel of Luke story of Joseph and Mary prior to the birth of Jesus of Nazareth in Bethlehem. In the town, the traveler encounters people with names taken from Biblical characters – the Devil, Miss Moses, and Luke. The traveler encounters others, including Carmen walking with the Devil, whom the traveler meets while trying to find a place to sleep. The traveler asks Carmen to go downtown with him. She responds by telling the traveler that she has something else to do but the Devil “can stick around” with him. The traveler meets Crazy Chester, who offers to provide him with a bed (e.g., “fix his rack”) if the traveler will take his dog, Jack. The chorus and last verse mention Miss Fanny (not intended to be sung as “Annie” ), who had charged the traveler the responsibility (e.g., “The Weight” or “load”) for giving “her regards to everyone” in the town. In the final verse, the traveler leaves Nazareth, dispirited by his experiences (e.g. “my bag is sinking low”). The traveler catches a “cannon ball” (i.e., a train, as in the American folk song “Wabash Cannonball”) to go back to see Miss Fanny. The traveler’s apparent visit to a holy city was a goal of the writer and composer, Robbie Robertson, who located the story in Nazareth, because Nazareth, Pennsylvania  is the hometown of the C.F. Martin & Company, a famed, long-time producer of guitars and other musical instruments. Such a city might be considered “holy” to American musicians and their friends. In the third verse, the traveler characterizes, using only Biblical references, a disagreement between two friends, Miss Moses and Luke. The traveler tells Miss Moses, “Go down, Miss Moses, there’s nothin’ you can say” to Luke, using the Negro spiritual song of liberation “Go Down Moses”  to associate her with the African-American civil rights struggle, a crisis that transformed America throughout the 1960s. (In the spiritual, Moses’sGod commands him to “Tell old Pharaoh, ‘Let my people go.’”) In doing so, the traveler tells Miss Moses that it is futile to persuade Luke to join or support the movement since his friend is preoccupied with “waitin’ on the Judgment Day.” Though Luke refuses to participate, he is so concerned that he asks the traveler to stay in Nazareth to take care of the young girl, Anna Lee. In addition, the song’s characters have high spiritual meaning to the traveler because the earthly characters mentioned in the song were based on real people The Band knew. However, the traveler’s mission, that started with a religious-like fervor, fails to uplift him. At each turn, the people Miss Fanny asks him to meet disappoint him. At the end, by leaving Nazareth, the traveler abandons Anna Lee, his broken vehicle, and his commitment to Fanny’s task, though he is not disaffected enough to not travel back to return to Fanny, an indicator of the strength of their relationship that is an uplifting experience to the listener.

The Weight - Robbie Robertson

I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin’ about half past dead
I just need some place where I can lay my head
“Hey, mister, can you tell me where a man might find a bed?”
He just grinned and shook my hand, “no” was all he said

Take a load off, Fanny
Take a load for free
Take a load off, Fanny
And (and) (and) you put the load right on me
(You put the load right on me)

I picked up my bag, I went lookin’ for a place to hide
When I saw Carmen and the Devil walkin’ side by side
I said, “Hey, Carmen, come on let’s go downtown”
She said, “I gotta go but my friend can stick around”

Take a load off, Fanny
Take a load for free
Take a load off, Fanny
And (and) (and) you put the load right on me
(You put the load right on me)

Go down, Miss Moses, there’s nothin’ you can say
It’s just ol’ Luke and Luke’s waitin’ on the Judgment Day
“Well, Luke, my friend, what about young Anna Lee?”
He said, “Do me a favor, son, won’t you stay and keep Anna Lee company?”

Take a load off, Fanny
Take a load for free
Take a load off, Fanny
And (and) (and) you put the load right on me
(You put the load right on me)

Crazy Chester followed me and he caught me in the fog
He said, “I will fix your rack if you’ll take Jack, my dog”
I said, “Wait a minute, Chester, you know I’m a peaceful man”
He said, “That’s okay, boy, won’t you feed him when you can”

Yeah, take a load off, Fanny
Take a load for free
Take a load off, Fanny
And (and) (and) you put the load right on me
(You put the load right on me)

Catch a cannon ball now to take me down the line
My bag is sinkin’ low and I do believe it’s time
To get back to Miss Fanny, you know she’s the only one
Who sent me here with her regards for everyone

Take a load off, Fanny
Take a load for free
Take a load off, Fanny
And (and) (and) you put the load right on me
(You put the load right on me)


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Low ~ Cracker

Cracker is an American alternative rock band featuring singer David Lowery and guitarist Johnny Hickman.

Shortly after Lowery’s former group Camper Van Beethoven called it quits in 1990, he began demoing material along with guitarist Johnny Hickman and bassist Davey Faragher, eventually going by the name Cracker. A brief tour with Virginia drummer Greg Weatherford followed. The band recorded a demo tape, later nicknamed Dirty Yellow Demos by the group’s fan base, which included early versions of songs that would appear on later albums.

By 1991, the newly formed band had signed a recording contract with Virgin Records and enlisted the help of several drummers/percussionists (Jim Keltner, Michael Urbano and Phil Jones), issuing their self-titled debut in 1992. The album featured the radio hit “Teen Angst”, which peaked at #1 on Modern Rock Tracks, and a second single entitled “Happy Birthday to Me”.

A year later, Cracker issued their best-selling album, Kerosene Hat, which featured the hits “Low” and “Get Off This”, as well as a cover of the Grateful Dead’s “Loser”. The album sold close to half a million copies.  Urbano performed on Kerosene Hat and toured with Cracker before leaving the band, along with Faragher. After a short stint with Bruce Hughes, the group added Bob Rupe as bassist. In 1993, Cracker contributed the song “Good Times Bad Times” to the Encomium tribute album to Led Zeppelin (which was recorded after their rendition of “When the Levee Breaks” was deemed “too weird”).

Three years later, The Golden Age was released, with “I Hate My Generation” as the lead single. However, the music scene was shifting away from guitar-driven alternative rock, and the single and album did poorly. Following the long-term additions of drummer Frank Funaro and keyboardist Kenny Margolis, the band tried again in 1998 with Gentleman’s Blues, featuring “The Good Life” as the lead single, to a lukewarm critical response and further poor sales.

Camper Van Beethoven unexpectedly re-formed in 1999. Since that time, Lowery has performed in both bands.

Low

Low” is a song by American alternative rock band Cracker. It appears on their 1993 album Kerosene Hat.

A number 64 hit on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart in May 1994, its biggest success was on the rock charts, where the song reached number three on the Modern Rock Tracks chart in November 1993 and number five on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart in March 1994. The music video portrayed lead singer David Lowery badly losing a boxing match with actress/comedienne Sandra Bernhard.

In 2012, the song was featured in the film The Perks of Being a Wallflower and its accompanying soundtrack.



Low - Lowery, Hickman, Faragher

Sometimes I wanna take you down.
Sometimes I wanna get you low.
Brush your hair back from your eyes.
Take you down let the river flow.

Sometimes I go and walk the street
Behind the green sheet of glass.
A million miles below their feet
A million miles, a million miles

I’ll be with you girl
Like being low
Hey hey hey like being stone.
I’ll be with you girl
Like being low
Hey hey hey like being stone.

A million poppies gonna make me sleep.
Just one rose and knows your name
The fruit is rusting on the vine
The fruit is calling from the trees

Hey don’t you wanna go down
Like some junkie cosmonaut
A million miles below their feet
A million miles a million miles

I’ll be with you girl
Like being low
Hey hey hey like being stone.
I’ll be with you girl
Like being low
Hey hey hey like being stone.

Blue blue is the sun.
Brown brown is the sky.
Green green of her eyes.
A million miles a million miles

Hey hey don’t you wanna go down
Like some disgraced cosmonaut
A million miles below their feet
A million miles a million miles

I’ll be with you girl
Like being low
Hey hey hey like being stone.
I’ll be with you girl
Like being low
Hey hey hey like being stone.

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Magic Arrow ~ Timber Tibre

timber-timbreTimber Timbre is a Canadian folk music project, featuring Mika Posen, Simon Trottier and Taylor Kirk. The moniker refers to an early series of recordings made in a timber-framed cabin set in the wooded outskirts of Bobcaygeon, Ontario.

Timber Timbre’s sound has been described as “an aesthetic rooted in swampy, ragged blues”  and “beautifully restrained blues from an alternate universe”, which creates an atmosphere that is cinematic and spooky.

Magic Arrow

The band’s song “Magic Arrow” was featured in the television show Breaking Bad, in the episode “Caballo Sin Nombre”, as well as in the TV series The Good Wife, in the episode “Bitcoin for Dummies”.



Magic Arrow – Timber Tibre

Mystic palm, gem and tarot
A few escape your magic arrow
I saw you reel them in for miles
Each captivated crooked smile
And you know you can heal them all
Your double diamond disposition
Refractions of your center prism
Your magic arrow flies precision

And you saw it from that vantage point
Perimeter scratched on the nation’s native hide
And we saw those christian clippers glide
Over white caps and white sails hide
Over white knuckles
And I was fine till I saw the pale horse ride
And open up it’s gape across the ocean floor
You were fine till you saw the white rider take
And take some more

Our mother’s milk double faro
A few escape your magic arrow
And with a Christ as bayonet
Oh you siphoned off the hellion’s threats
And even in your ghastly visions
Your magic arrow flies precision
Whistles fly like a boiling potion
Charges like a locomotive

And you saw it from that vantage point
Perimeter scratched on the nation’s native hide
And we saw those christian clippers glide
Over white caps and white sails and hide
Over white knuckles
And you were fine till you saw the pale horse ride
Open up it’s gape across the ocean floor
You were fine till you saw the white rider take
And take some more

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Hank Williams Guitar ~ Paul Sachs

Paul_Sachs-1rr2Paul Sachs is an American folk song writer and musician.

Paul Sachs writes lyrical and gritty songs.  Born and raised in New York City. Bob Dylan, Tom Waits and Springsteen are the songwriters that influenced him, and pushed him into the folk music circles of the city. Chosen as one of Falcon Ridge Folk Festival’s Emerging Artists in 2011.

Sachs still lives in NYC, performing in various venues around the city. He has recorded five independent albums, featuring raw and seeringly personal songs of life and love on the mean streets. His fingerstyle guitar work and powerful voice combine to create mesmerizing vignettes. His CD, “Oil Town” was named one of the top folk albums in 2011 on both the Folk DJ list and Roots Music Report. Sing Out magazine states: “Song after song he creates some lovely melodies. The cuts on “Oil Town” involve those challenged by love, by work, and the struggles created by economic imbalance…This is a keeper, and its excellence grows on you.”

In 2013 he won the prestigious New Folk Songwriter’s contest at the Kerrville Folk Festival in Texas.

Hank Williams Guitar

Hank Williams Guitar” is the second track off of Paul Sach’s 2014 album, Survival Is The New Success. It has a limited release in June 2014 and is currently available only on his website.

I don’t currently have the lyrics but when I do, I will post them here.  If you enjoy this song, check out his other works at Amazon or CD Baby, and be sure to purchase a copy of this CD from his website.



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Punk Rock Girl ~ The Dead Milkmen

The Dead Milkmen were a satirical punk band formed in 1983 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The band consisted of Joe Genaro (“Joe Jack Talcum”; guitar, vocals), Dave Schulthise (“Dave Blood”; bass), Dean Sabatino (“Dean Clean”; drums), and Rodney Linderman (“Rodney Anonymous”; vocals, synth).

The band has claimed that the name comes from a character in Toni Morrison’s book Song of Solomon (“Milkman Dead”), as well as from one of Genaro’s high school projects.

The band’s musical style could be described as jangly, driving punk rock with a steady supply of irreverent humor as evident from the song titles “My Many Smells”, “Taking Retards to the Zoo” and “If You Love Someone, Set Them On Fire.” Anonymous and Talcum both sang with heavy Philadelphia accents often sounding exaggeratedly snotty.

Punk Rock Girl

Punk Rock Girl” is the best known song from The Dead Milkmen and first appeared on their 1988 album, Beelzebubba.  The song’s video won heavy rotation on MTV.

The song is featured in the video game Tony Hawk’s Project 8 and is covered by MxPx in On the Cover II. It was also covered by Streetlight Manifesto in their cover-project 99 Songs of Revolution. The song was also briefly heard in the pilot episode to the Fox series Raising Hope. “Punk Rock Girl” was also covered by Diesel Boy on the 1999 album Sofa King Cool. The music videos for “Punk Rock Girl” and “Smokin’ Banana Peels” were shown on episodes of Beavis and Butt-head.

Punk Rock Girl – Sabatino, Genaro, Shulthise

One Saturday I took a walk to Zipperhead
I met a girl there and she almost knocked me dead

Punk rock girl
Please look at me
Punk rock girl
What do you see?
Let’s travel round the world
Just you and me punk rock girl

I tapped her on the shoulder
And said do you have a beau?
She looked at me and smiled and said she did not know

Punk rock girl
Give me a chance
Punk rock girl
Let’s go slam dance
We’ll dress like Minnie Pearl
Just you and me punk rock girl

We went to the Philly Pizza Company
And ordered some hot tea
The waitress said well no, we only have it iced
So we jumped up on the table and shouted anarchy
And someone played a Beach Boys song on the jukebox
It it was “California Dreamin”
So we started screamin
On such a winter’s day

She took me to her parents for a Sunday meal
Her father took one look at me and he began to squeal

Punk rock girl
It makes no sense
Punk rock girl
Your dad is vice president
Just like the Duke of Earl
Yeah you’re for me punk rock girl

We went to a shopping mall
And laughed at all the shoppers
And security guards trailed us to a record shop
We asked for Mojo Nixon
They said he don’t work here
We said if you don’t got Mojo Nixon then your store could use some fixin

We got into her car away we started rollin
I said how much you pay for this
Said nothin man it’s stolen

Punk rock girl
You look so wild
Punk rock girl
Let’s have a child
We’ll name her Minnie Pearl
Just you and me
Eat fudge banana swirl
Just you and me
We’ll travel round the world
Just you and me
Punk rock girl

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