Long Distance Runaround – Yes

Yes are an English progressive rock band that formed in London in 1968. Their music is marked by sharp dynamic contrasts, often extended song lengths, esoteric, abstract lyrics, and a general showcasing of its members’ instrumental skills. Yes uses symphonic and other so called ‘classical’ structures with their blend of musical styles in an innovative “marriage” of music. Despite a great many lineup changes, occasional splits and many changes in popular music, the band has continued for nearly 40 years and still retains a strong international following.

The 1970s Yes recordings are still considered the classic Yes sound by many fans. These albums feature complex classically influenced arrangements, unusual time signatures, virtuoso musicianship, dramatic dynamic and metrical changes and oblique, stream-of-consciousness lyrics. Songs often exceeded the standard three-minute pop-song structure with lengthy multi-part suites sometimes lasting 20 minutes or more, making the band a leading 70s progressive rock combo. Vocal verses alternated with atmospheric instrumental interludes, frenetic ensemble passages and extended guitar, keyboard and bass improvisations. The signature sonic features of this ‘classic’ period are Jon Anderson’s distinctive high-register lead vocals, the group’s strong vocal harmonies, Rick Wakeman (and Patrick Moraz) and Steve Howe’s respective keyboard and guitar solos, Bill Bruford’s and later Alan White’s polyrhythmic drumming and Chris Squire’s highly melodic and discursive bass playing, enhanced by the sound of his Rickenbacker model RM1999 bass.

Long Distance Runaround

Long Distance Runaround” is a song by the progressive rock group Yes first recorded for their 1971 album, Fragile. Written by lead singer Jon Anderson, the song was released as a B-side to “Roundabout” but became a surprise hit in its own right as a staple of album-oriented rock radio. The song’s 3:30 running time was uncharacteristically brief for a group known for expansive songs often longer than ten minutes. The end of the song fades into the next track on the album, “The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)”.

Yes co-founder Jon Anderson wrote the lyrics to this song while allegedly remembering his encounters with religious hypocrisy and competition he experienced in attending church regularly as a youth in northern England. “Long time / waiting to feel the sound” was a sentiment toward wanting to see a real, compassionate, non-threatening example of godliness.

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/yes-long-distance-runaround.flv[/flv]

Long distance runaround
Long time waiting to feel the sound
I still remember the dream there
I still remember the time you said goodbye
Did we really tell lies
Letting in the sunshine
Did we really count to one hundred

Cold summer listening
Hot colour melting the anger to stone
I still remember the dream there
I still remember the time you said goodbye
Did we really tell lies
Did we really count to one hundred

  • Audio from the 1971 album, Fragile:

Click to Purchase
(397)

About DJ Allyn

DJ Allyn is a burned out radio guy who went on to become a burned out sound engineer for a few Seattle area grunge bands in the 1980s and 1990s. Left the madness of worldwide tours with bands, cleaned up my act and went into the relative sanity of sound engineering for television series. Currently working as the Director of Sound for a television series being filmed in North Vancouver, British Columbia. I am always on the lookout for interesting videos, old music, and fun.

One thought on “Long Distance Runaround – Yes

  1. Gawd how I wore out that album!

    I still have every Yes album made, in vinyl (and now digitally too, of course)…most of them were second or third buys. :grin:

Got a comment?