Artist: Cream

Sunshine of Your Love – Cream

Cream was a 1960s British rock band comprising guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. They were celebrated as the first great power trio and supergroup of rock. Their sound was characterised by a hybrid of blues, pop and psychedelic rock. Cream combined Clapton’s blues guitar playing with the powerful voice and intense basslines of Jack Bruce and the jazz-influenced drumming of Ginger Baker. They have sold over 35 million albums worldwide. Wheels of Fire was the world’s first platinum-selling album.

Cream’s music included songs based on traditional blues such as “Crossroads” and “Spoonful”, and modern blues such as “Born Under a Bad Sign”, as well as more eccentric songs such as “Strange Brew”, “Tales of Brave Ulysses” and “Toad”. Cream’s biggest hits were “I Feel Free”, “Sunshine of Your Love”, “White Room”, “Crossroads”, and “Badge”.

Cream, together with The Jimi Hendrix Experience, made a significant impact upon the popular music of the time, providing a heavy yet technically proficient musical theme that foreshadowed the emergence of bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and The Jeff Beck Group in the late 1960s. The band’s live performances influenced progressive rock acts, jam bands such as The Allman Brothers Band, Rush, Grateful Dead and Phish, and even heavy metal bands such as Black Sabbath. Although Cream’s studio work has stood the test of time, their true influence lies in their live sets. Cream took the idea of jamming to a new level, incorporating their individual virtuosity into long 20-minute jams.

Sunshine of Your Love

Development of the song began in January 1967 when Bruce and Clapton attended a Jimi Hendrix show at the Saville Theatre in London. Inspired by Hendrix’s performance, Bruce returned home and wrote the memorable bass riff that runs throughout the song. Most of the lyrics to “Sunshine of Your Love” were written during an all-night creative session between Bruce and Brown, a poet who worked with the band: “I picked up my double bass and played the riff. Pete looked out the window and the sun was coming up. He wrote ‘It’s getting near dawn and lights close their tired eyes…'” Clapton later wrote the chorus (“I’ve been waiting so long…”) which also yielded the song’s title.

The band’s publisher, Atlantic Records, initially rejected the song. Booker T. Jones, leader of Booker T. and the MG’s and a respected Atlantic musician, heard the band rehearsing the song in the Atlantic studios and recommended it to the record company bosses. Based on this recommendation, Atlantic approved the recording.

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/Cream-SunshineofYourLove.flv[/flv]

It’s gettin’ near dawn,
When lights close their tired eyes.
I’ll soon be with you my love,
To give you my dawn surprise.
I’ll be with you darling soon,
I’ll be with you when the stars start falling.

I’ve been waiting so long
To be where I’m going
In the sunshine of your love.

I’m with you my love,
The light’s shinin’ through on you.
Yes, I’m with you my love,
It’s the morning and just we two.
I’ll stay with you darling now,
I’ll stay with you till my seeds are all dried up.

I’ve been waiting so long
To be where I’m going
In the sunshine of your love.

  • Audio from the 1967 album, Disraeli Gears:

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Those Were The Days – Cream

Cream were a 1960s British rock band consisting of bassist/lead vocalist Jack Bruce, guitarist/vocalist Eric Clapton, and drummer Ginger Baker. Their sound was characterised by a hybrid of blues, hard rock and psychedelic rock. Retrospectively determined to be “the first supergroup”, Cream combined Clapton’s blues guitar playing with the powerful voice and intense basslines of Jack Bruce and the jazz-influenced drumming of Ginger Baker.

Cream’s music included songs based on traditional blues such as “Crossroads” and “Spoonful”, and modern blues such as “Born Under a Bad Sign”, as well as more eccentric songs such as “Strange Brew”, “Tales of Brave Ulysses” and “Toad”. Cream’s biggest hits were “I Feel Free”, “Sunshine of Your Love”, “White Room”, “Crossroads”, and “Badge”.

Cream, together with The Jimi Hendrix Experience, made a significant impact upon the popular music of the time, providing a heavy yet technically proficient musical theme that foreshadowed the emergence of bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and The Jeff Beck Group in the late 1960s. The band’s live performances influenced progressive rock acts such as Rush, and jam bands such as The Allman Brothers Band, Grateful Dead and Phish, and heavy metal bands such as Black Sabbath.

Those Were The Days

When the city of atlantis
Stood serene above the sea
Long time before our time
When the world was free
Those were the days

Golden symbols flying
On ocarina sounds
Before wild medusa’s serpents
Gave birth to hell
Disguised as heaven

Those were the days
(yes they were)
Those were the days
Those were the ways
Miracles everywhere where are they now?
(they’re gone)

Those were the ways
(yes they were)
Those were the ways
Those were the days
(yes they were)
Those were the days

Tie your painted shoes and dance
Blue daylight in your hair
Overhead a noiseless eagle fans a flame
(finally)
Wonder everywhere

Those were the days
(yes they were)
Those were the days
Those were the ways
Miracles everywhere where are they now?
(they’re gone)

Those were the ways
(yes they were)
Those were the ways
Those were the days
(yes they were)
Those were the days

Audio from the 1968 album, Wheels of Fire:


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Born Under a Bad Sign – Cream

Cream were a 1960s British rock band consisting of bassist/lead vocalist Jack Bruce, guitarist/vocalist Eric Clapton, and drummer Ginger Baker. Their sound was characterised by a hybrid of blues, hard rock and psychedelic rock. Retrospectively determined to be “the first supergroup”, Cream combined Clapton’s blues guitar playing with the powerful voice and intense basslines of Jack Bruce and the jazz-influenced drumming of Ginger Baker.

Cream’s music included songs based on traditional blues such as “Crossroads” and “Spoonful”, and modern blues such as “Born Under a Bad Sign”, as well as more eccentric songs such as “Strange Brew”, “Tales of Brave Ulysses” and “Toad”. Cream’s biggest hits were “I Feel Free”, “Sunshine of Your Love”, “White Room”, “Crossroads”, and “Badge”.

Cream, together with The Jimi Hendrix Experience, made a significant impact upon the popular music of the time, providing a heavy yet technically proficient musical theme that foreshadowed the emergence of bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and The Jeff Beck Group in the late 1960s. The band’s live performances influenced progressive rock acts such as Rush, and jam bands such as The Allman Brothers Band, Grateful Dead and Phish, and heavy metal bands such as Black Sabbath.

Born Under a Bad Sign

Originally a song wrote and recorded by Albert King, in 1966, King asked Cream to cover the song in 1968 making it one of the most popular tracks of their third album, Wheels of Fire.

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/cream-born-under-a-bad-sign.flv[/flv]

Born under a bad sign.
I’ve been down since I began to crawl.
If it wasn’t for bad luck,
I wouldn’t have no luck at all.

Bad luck and trouble’s my only friend.
I’ve been down ever since I was ten.

Born under a bad sign.
I’ve been down since I began to crawl.
If it wasn’t for bad luck,
I wouldn’t have no luck at all.

You know, wine and women is all I crave.
A big bad woman’s gonna carry me to my grave.

Born under a bad sign.
I’ve been down since I began to crawl.
If it wasn’t for bad luck,
I wouldn’t have no luck at all.

Bad luck and trouble’s my only friend.
I’ve been down ever since I was ten.

Born under a bad sign.
I’ve been down since I began to crawl.
If it wasn’t for bad luck,
I wouldn’t have no luck.
If it wasn’t for real bad luck,
I wouldn’t have no luck at all.

Born under a bad sign.
Born under a bad sign.

  • Audio from the 1968 album, Wheels of Fire:

album-wheels of fire
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White Room ~ Cream

Cream were a 1960s British rock band consisting of bassist/lead vocalist Jack Bruce, guitarist/vocalist Eric Clapton, and drummer Ginger Baker. Their sound was characterised by a hybrid of blues, hard rock and psychedelic rock. Retrospectively determined to be “the first supergroup”, Cream combined Clapton’s blues guitar playing with the powerful voice and intense basslines of Jack Bruce and the jazz-influenced drumming of Ginger Baker.

Cream’s music included songs based on traditional blues such as “Crossroads” and “Spoonful”, and modern blues such as “Born Under a Bad Sign”, as well as more eccentric songs such as “Strange Brew”, “Tales of Brave Ulysses” and “Toad”. Cream’s biggest hits were “I Feel Free”, “Sunshine of Your Love”, “White Room”, “Crossroads”,  and “Badge”.

Cream, together with The Jimi Hendrix Experience, made a significant impact upon the popular music of the time, providing a heavy yet technically proficient musical theme that foreshadowed the emergence of bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and The Jeff Beck Group in the late 1960s. The band’s live performances influenced progressive rock acts such as Rush,  and jam bands such as The Allman Brothers Band, Grateful Dead and Phish, and heavy metal bands such as Black Sabbath.

White Room

After bassist Jack Bruce wrote the guitar pieces, Cream’s lyricist, poet Pete Brown, grouped colorful four-syllable phrases, loosely organized around images of waiting in an English railway station influenced by the drugs he was taking. The combination is often considered one of the shining moments in British psychedelia. “White Room” is further noted for its unusual time signature of 5/4 in the introduction and bridge, with triplets played on toms by Ginger Baker, his thunderous bass drum part also lacing the verses. Finally, “White Room” is notable for showcasing guitarist Eric Clapton’s best known use of the wah-wah pedal (possibly aside from “Tales of Brave Ulysses”) in the bridge and extended solo.

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/cream-white_room.flv[/flv]

In the white room with black curtains near the station.
Black-roof country, no gold pavements, tired starlings.
Silver horses run down moonbeams in your dark eyes.
Dawn-light smiles on you leaving, my contentment.

I’ll wait in this place where the sun never shines;
Wait in this place where the shadows run from themselves.

You said no strings could secure you at the station.
Platform ticket, restless diesels, goodbye windows.
I walked into such a sad time at the station.
As I walked out, felt my own need just beginning.

I’ll wait in the queue when the trains come back;
Lie with you where the shadows run from themselves.

At the party she was kindness in the hard crowd.
Consolation for the old wound now forgotten.
Yellow tigers crouched in jungles in her dark eyes.
She’s just dressing, goodbye windows, tired starlings.

I’ll sleep in this place with the lonely crowd;
Lie in the dark where the shadows run from themselves.

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