Artist: Herman’s Hermits

No Milk Today ~ Herman’s Hermits

Herman’s Hermits were an English pop band, formed in Manchester in 1963 as ‘Herman & The Hermits’. The group’s management and producer Mickie Most (who controlled the band’s output) emphasized a simple, non-threatening and clean-cut image, although the band originally played R&B numbers. This helped Herman’s Hermits become hugely successful in the mid-1960s but hampered the band’s creativity, relegating Noone, Hopwood, Leckenby and Green’s original songs to quickly recorded B-Sides and album cuts.

Original members were Keith Hopwood (guitar, vocals), Karl Green (guitar, vocals), Alan Wrigley (bass guitar, vocals), Steve Titterington (drums), and Peter Noone (lead vocals). Although the youngest of a remarkably young group, fifteen-year-old Noone was already a veteran actor, with experience on the British soap opera, Coronation Street. Derek “Lek” Leckenby (guitar, vocals), and Barry “Bean” Whitwam (drums), joined later from another local group, The Wailers, Whitwam replacing Titterington, Karl Green switching to bass guitar to replace Wrigley, and Leckenby effectively taking Green’s position. After Leckenby joined, the group obtained a deal with producer Mickie Most and signed to EMI records in Europe and MGM records in the United States.

The band played on many singles including “I’m Into Something Good,” “Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” (1965), and “I’m Henry VIII, I Am.” The last was said at the time to be “the fastest-selling song in history.”

Despite the group’s competent musicianship, many of their subsequent singles employed some session musicians, including Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, with contributions from the band, although the role of session players on Herman’s Hermits records has been exaggerated in the rock media and in inaccurate liner notes on the recent ABKCO Retrospective, which fail to credit the Hermits’ playing. Mickie Most did use session musicians on many of the records he produced, including on a number of Hermits singles, as was his (and, for that matter, industry) practice at the time, a practice that continues today. Even the Yardbirds were forced by Most to make due with session musicians (except for Jimmy Page) on their Most produced recordings. (see Hammer of the Gods: The Led Zepplin Saga by Stephen Davis). Continuing acrimony between former members of Herman’s Hermits has increased the misinformation about the group’s role on their records. Leckenby in particular was a gifted guitarist.

No Milk Today

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No milk today, my love has gone away
The bottle stands forlorn, a symbol of the dawn
No milk today, it seems a common sight
But people passing by don’t know the reason why

How could they know just what this message means
The end of my hopes, the end of all my dreams
How could they know the palace there had been
Behind the door where my love reigned as queen

No milk today, it wasn’t always so
The company was gay, we’d turn night into day

But all that’s left is a place dark and lonely
A terraced house in a mean street back of town
Becomes a shrine when I think of you only
Just two up two down

No milk today, it wasn’t always so
The company was gay, we’d turn night into day
As music played the faster did we dance
We felt it both at once, the start of our romance

How could they know just what this message means
The end of my hopes, the end of all my dreams
How could they know a palace there had been
Behind the door where my love reigned as queen

No milk today, my love has gone away
The bottle stands forlorn, a symbol of the dawn

But all that’s left is a place dark and lonely
A terraced house in a mean street back of town
Becomes a shrine when I think of you only
Just two up two down

No milk today, my love has gone away
The bottle stands forlorn, a symbol of the dawn
No milk today, it seems a common sight
But people passing by don’t know the reason why

How could they know just what this message means
The end of my hopes, the end of all my dreams
How could they know a palace there had been
Behind the door where my love reigned as queen

No milk today, it wasn’t always so
The company was gay, we’d turn night into day

But all that’s left is a place dark and lonely
A terraced house in a mean street back of town
Oh all that’s left is a place dark and lonely
A terraced house in a mean street back of town
Oh all that’s left is a place dark and lonely
A terraced house in a mean street back of town

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