Artist: Jimi Hendrix

Castles Made of Sand ~ Jimi Hendrix

jimi-hendrixJimi Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter whose guitar playing was influential on rock music. After initial success in Europe, he achieved fame in the USA following his 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. Later, Hendrix headlined the iconic 1969 Woodstock Festival.

Hendrix often favored raw overdriven amplifiers with high gain and treble and helped develop the previously undesirable technique of guitar feedback. Hendrix, along with bands such as Cream was one of the musicians who popularized the wah-wah pedal in mainstream rock which he often used to deliver an exaggerated pitch in his solos, particularly with high bends and use of legato based around the pentatonic scale. He was influenced by blues artists such as B. B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Albert King, and Elmore James, rhythm and blues and soul guitarists Curtis Mayfield, Steve Cropper, as well as by some modern jazz. In 1966, Hendrix, who played and recorded with Little Richard’s band from 1964 to 1965, was quoted as saying, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice.”

Carlos Santana has suggested that Hendrix’ music may have been influenced by his Native American heritage. As a record producer, Hendrix also broke new ground in using the recording studio as an extension of his musical ideas. He was one of the first to experiment with stereophonic and phasing effects for rock recording.

Hendrix won many of the most prestigious rock music awards in his lifetime, and has been posthumously awarded many more, including being inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. An English Heritage “Blue plaque” was erected in his name on his former residence at Brook Street, London, in September 1997. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 6627 Hollywood Blvd.) was dedicated in 1994. In 2006, his debut US album, Are You Experienced, was inducted into the United States National Recording Registry, and Rolling Stone named Hendrix the top guitarist on its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003.

Castles Made of Sand

The song is a melancholy meditation on thwarted plans. The first verse features a loving relationship reduced to conflict and social disgrace; the second verse recounts the death of a native American Indian boy who dreams of glory in battle, but is eventually killed in his sleep. The third verse presents a disabled girl who prepares for suicide, only to see a “golden winged ship passing my way”, which causes her to jump excitedly in her wheelchair. However: “it really didn’t have to stop – it just kept on goin'”. Each verse is followed by the chorus, which consists of slight variations on the line, “…and so castles made of sand fall in the sea, eventually…”.

The song is known for its intricate guitar solo, which is heard on the record played backwards.

A common interpretation of the lyric centres on the chorus and its metaphor of universal transience — “Castles made of sand fall in the sea eventually” — illustrated by specific cases in the verses, which suggest that not only love and ambition but also disease and fear, will fade and vanish.

Leon Hendrix, the younger brother of Jimi, has said that Jimi revealed privately to him that the song was about their family.  The first verse is their mother leaving their father Al for the final time. The second verse is referencing his Native American heritage and the stories his grandmother (a quarter Cherokee)  would tell him. The boy who played “war games in the woods with his Indian friends” is said to be Leon (as stated by himself), but could also be about Jimi. The third verse, by this account, channels Jimi’s memories of his mother Lucille in hospital suffering from liver disease, and wishing to die so she would suffer no more: “to her legs she smiled you won’t hurt me no more.” Lucille did have cirrhosis of the liver, but was recovering outside of Hospital, when she was admitted unconscious to hospital, where she died from a ruptured spleen caused by a blow from an unknown source, not a liver complaint as is often stated, although this was listed as a contributing factor on her death certificate. The song “Little Wing” is also about his mother Lucille, according to Leon, although in interviews he gave an alternate interpretation, most likely so he would not have to recount painful memories (it is widely known that Jimi didn’t like to recollect on his past to the public) Jimi himself said the song was about the Monterey Pop Festival personified as a girl.

Locals from the Moroccan town Diabat have claimed that the song title was inspired by the Bordj El Berod-watchtower ruin. This statement however is not likely to be true as Jimi stayed in Morocco in 1969 (Castles Made Of Sand was written in 1967).

Down the street you can hear her scream “you’re a disgrace”
As she slams the door in his drunken face,
And now he stands outside and all the neighbours start to gossip and drool.

He cries “Oh girl, you must be mad,
What happened to the sweet love you and me had?”
Against the door he leans and starts a scene,
And his tears fall and burn the garden green.

And so castles made of sand, fall in the sea, eventually.

A little Indian brave who before he was ten, played war games in
the woods with his Indian friends, and he built a dream that when he
grew up, he would be a fearless warrior Indian Chief.

Many moons passed and more the dream grew strong, until tomorrow
He would sing his first war song,
And fight his first battle, but something went wrong,
Suprise attack killed him in his sleep that night

And so castles made of sand, melts into the sea eventually.

There was a young girl, whose heart was a frown,
Because she was crippled for life, and couldn’t speak a sound
And she wished and prayed she would stop living, so she decided to die.
She drew her wheel chair to the edge of the shore, and to her legs she smiled

“You won’t hurt me no more.”
But then a sight she’d never seen made her JUMP AND SAY
“Look, a golden winged ship is passing my way”
And it really didn’t have to stop…it just kept on going.
And so castles made of sand slips into the sea,
Eventually

  • Audio from the 2010 album, Experience Hendrix: The Best of Jimi Hendrix:
Click to Purchase

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Voodoo Child (Slight Return) – Jimi Hendrix

jimi-hendrixJimi Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter whose guitar playing was influential on rock music. After initial success in Europe, he achieved fame in the USA following his 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. Later, Hendrix headlined the iconic 1969 Woodstock Festival.

Hendrix often favored raw overdriven amplifiers with high gain and treble and helped develop the previously undesirable technique of guitar feedback. Hendrix, along with bands such as Cream was one of the musicians who popularized the wah-wah pedal in mainstream rock which he often used to deliver an exaggerated pitch in his solos, particularly with high bends and use of legato based around the pentatonic scale. He was influenced by blues artists such as B. B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Albert King, and Elmore James, rhythm and blues and soul guitarists Curtis Mayfield, Steve Cropper, as well as by some modern jazz. In 1966, Hendrix, who played and recorded with Little Richard’s band from 1964 to 1965, was quoted as saying, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice.”

Carlos Santana has suggested that Hendrix’ music may have been influenced by his Native American heritage. As a record producer, Hendrix also broke new ground in using the recording studio as an extension of his musical ideas. He was one of the first to experiment with stereophonic and phasing effects for rock recording.

Hendrix won many of the most prestigious rock music awards in his lifetime, and has been posthumously awarded many more, including being inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. An English Heritage “Blue plaque” was erected in his name on his former residence at Brook Street, London, in September 1997. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 6627 Hollywood Blvd.) was dedicated in 1994. In 2006, his debut US album, Are You Experienced, was inducted into the United States National Recording Registry, and Rolling Stone named Hendrix the top guitarist on its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003.

Voodoo Child ( Slight Return)

The song was recorded in 1968, and was re-released as a single after Hendrix’s death in 1970. It was the A side on a three-track record, and reached Number 1 in the UK. It was catalogued as “Voodoo Chile” (Track 2095 001), and that is the title which appears on the single and is the title referred to officially. This obviously confuses it with the 15-minute song on the album Electric Ladyland. The B-side of the single featured two of his previous hits: “Hey Joe” and “All Along the Watchtower”.

The genesis of “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” was essentially in “Voodoo Chile”, a long blues jam featuring guest Steve Winwood  On May 3, 1968 (the day after “Voodoo Chile”‘s recording), a crew from ABC filmed the Jimi Hendrix Experience while they played. As Hendrix explained it:

[S]omeone was filming when we started doing [Voodoo Child]. We did that about three times because they wanted to film us in the studio, to make us-“Make it look like you’re recording, boys”-one of them scenes, you know, so, “OK, let’s play this in E, a-one, a-two, a-three,” and then we went into “Voodoo Child”. (Technically, the track is in Eb — Jimi tuned down one half step on everything he recorded after experimenting with Eb standard tuning while recording Little Wing, as he discovered he preferred it to standard E tuning.)

The song became one of Hendrix’s staples in live performances and would vary in length from 7 to 18 minutes. Notable live performances were at Woodstock and during his 1969 show at the Royal Albert Hall, originally released on the posthumous Hendrix in the West album, later re-released on the Experienced Box Set. On the Band of Gypsys live album Live at the Fillmore East, Hendrix refers to the song as the Black Panthers’ national anthem.

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/jimi-hendrix-voodoo-child.flv[/flv]

Well, I stand up next to a mountain
And I chop it down with the edge of my hand

Yeah

Well, I stand up next to a mountain
And I chop it down with the edge of my hand
Well, I pick up all the pieces and make an island
Might even raise a little sand

Yeah

’cause I’m a voodoo child
Lord knows I’m a voodoo child baby
I want to say one more last thing
I didn’t mean to take up all your sweet time
I’ll give it right back to ya one of these days

Hahaha

I said I didn’t mean to take up all your sweet time
I’ll give it right back one of these days

Oh yeah

If I don’t meet you no more in this world then uh
I’ll meet ya on the next one
And don’t be late
Don’t be late

’cause I’m a voodoo child voodoo child
Lord knows I’m a voodoo child

Hey hey hey

I’m a voodoo child baby
I don’t take no for an answer

Question no
Yeah

  • Audio from the 1999 album, Live at the Filmore East Recorded December 31, 1969:


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Fire – Jimi Hendrix

jimi-hendrixJimi Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter whose guitar playing was influential on rock music. After initial success in Europe, he achieved fame in the USA following his 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. Later, Hendrix headlined the iconic 1969 Woodstock Festival.

Hendrix often favored raw overdriven amplifiers with high gain and treble and helped develop the previously undesirable technique of guitar feedback. Hendrix, along with bands such as Cream was one of the musicians who popularized the wah-wah pedal in mainstream rock which he often used to deliver an exaggerated pitch in his solos, particularly with high bends and use of legato based around the pentatonic scale. He was influenced by blues artists such as B. B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Albert King, and Elmore James, rhythm and blues and soul guitarists Curtis Mayfield, Steve Cropper, as well as by some modern jazz. In 1966, Hendrix, who played and recorded with Little Richard’s band from 1964 to 1965, was quoted as saying, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice.”

Carlos Santana has suggested that Hendrix’ music may have been influenced by his Native American heritage. As a record producer, Hendrix also broke new ground in using the recording studio as an extension of his musical ideas. He was one of the first to experiment with stereophonic and phasing effects for rock recording.

Hendrix won many of the most prestigious rock music awards in his lifetime, and has been posthumously awarded many more, including being inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. An English Heritage “Blue plaque” was erected in his name on his former residence at Brook Street, London, in September 1997. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 6627 Hollywood Blvd.) was dedicated in 1994. In 2006, his debut US album, Are You Experienced, was inducted into the United States National Recording Registry, and Rolling Stone named Hendrix the top guitarist on its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003.

Fire

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/jimi-hendrix-fire.flv[/flv]

Alright!
Now dig this baby!
You don’t care for me,
I don’t care about that.
You got a new fool,
Hah, I like him like that.
I have only one burning desire,
Let me stand next to your fire.
[Let me stand next to your fire] Hey, let me stand next to your fire
[Let me stand next to your fire] Oh, let me stand baby
[Let me stand next to your fire] Let me stand
[Let me stand next to your fire] Yeah baby

Listen here baby,
Stop acting so crazy!
You say your mom ain’t home,
It ain’t my concern.
Just don’t play with me,
and you won’t get burned.
I have only one itching desire,
Let me stand next to your fire
[Let me stand next to your fire] Yeah, let me stand next to your fire
[Let me stand next to your fire] Let me stand
[Let me stand next to your fire] Oh, Let me stand
[Let me stand next to your fire] Oh

Oh, move over Rover,
And let Jimi take over.
Yeah, you know what I’m talking about
Yeah!
Get on with it baby!

That’s what I’m talking about.
Now dig this!
Ha!
Now listen baby!
You try to give me your money,
You better save it babe.
Save it for your rainy day.
I have only one burning desire,
let me stand next to your fire.
[Let me stand next to your fire] Oh, let me stand
[Let me stand next to your fire] Let me stand baby
[Let me stand next to your fire] I ain’t gonna do you no harm
[Let me stand next to your fire] Oh

Yeah!
You better move it baby . . .
I ain’t gonna hurt you baby . . .

  • Audio from the 1967 album, Are You Experienced?

album-are-you-experienced
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Wild Thing ~ Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter whose guitar playing was influential on rock music. After initial success in Europe, he achieved fame in the USA following his 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. Later, Hendrix headlined the iconic 1969 Woodstock Festival.

Hendrix often favored raw overdriven amplifiers with high gain and treble and helped develop the previously undesirable technique of guitar feedback.  Hendrix, along with bands such as Cream was one of the musicians who popularized the wah-wah pedal in mainstream rock which he often used to deliver an exaggerated pitch in his solos, particularly with high bends and use of legato based around the pentatonic scale. He was influenced by blues artists such as B. B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Albert King, and Elmore James,   rhythm and blues and soul guitarists Curtis Mayfield, Steve Cropper, as well as by some modern jazz. In 1966, Hendrix, who played and recorded with Little Richard’s band from 1964 to 1965, was quoted as saying, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice.

Carlos Santana has suggested that Hendrix’ music may have been influenced by his Native American heritage. As a record producer, Hendrix also broke new ground in using the recording studio as an extension of his musical ideas. He was one of the first to experiment with stereophonic and phasing effects for rock recording.

Hendrix won many of the most prestigious rock music awards in his lifetime, and has been posthumously awarded many more, including being inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. An English Heritage “Blue plaque” was erected in his name on his former residence at Brook Street, London, in September 1997. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 6627 Hollywood Blvd.) was dedicated in 1994. In 2006, his debut US album, Are You Experienced, was inducted into the United States National Recording Registry, and Rolling Stone named Hendrix the top guitarist on its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003.

Wild Thing

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/Jimi_Hendrix-Wild_Thing.flv[/flv]

come on man sing it with me
Wild thing, you make my heart sing
oh
you make a everything, groovy
wild thing
wild thing i think you move me
but i want a know for sure
come on and sssock it to me one more time
(click)you move me
wild thing, you make my heart sing
oh
you make a everything, groovy
a sing again
wild thing
yeah
wild thing i think you move me
but i want a know for sure
come on and sssock it to me one more time again
oh shucks i love ya
wild thing, you make my heart sing
you make a everything, groovy
yeah wild thing
yeah wild thing
yeah yeah wild thing
yeah yeah yeah wild thing
oh sock it to me
wild thing

  • Audio from the 1973 The Ultimate Experience album:

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Wind Cries Mary ~ Jimi Hendrix

jimi-hendrixJimi Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter whose guitar playing was influential on rock music. After initial success in Europe, he achieved fame in the USA following his 1967 performance at the Monterrey Pop Festival. Later, Hendrix headlined the iconic 1969 Woodstock Festival.

Hendrix often favored raw over driven amplifiers with high gain and treble and helped develop the previously undesirable technique of guitar feedback. Hendrix, along with bands such as Cream was one of the musicians who popularized the wah-wah pedal in mainstream rock which he often used to deliver an exaggerated pitch in his solos, particularly with high bends and use of legato based around the pentatonic scale. He was influenced by blues artists such as B. B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Albert King, and Elmore James, rhythm and blues and soul guitarists Curtis Mayfield, Steve Cropper, as well as by some modern jazz. In 1966, Hendrix, who played and recorded with Little Richard’s band from 1964 to 1965, was quoted as saying, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice.”

Carlos Santana has suggested that Hendrix’ music may have been influenced by his Native American heritage. As a record producer, Hendrix also broke new ground in using the recording studio as an extension of his musical ideas. He was one of the first to experiment with stereophonic and phasing effects for rock recording.

Hendrix won many of the most prestigious rock music awards in his lifetime, and has been posthumously awarded many more, including being inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. An English Heritage “Blue plaque” was erected in his name on his former residence at Brook Street, London, in September 1997. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 6627 Hollywood Blvd.) was dedicated in 1994. In 2006, his debut US album, Are You Experienced, was inducted into the United States National Recording Registry, and Rolling Stone named Hendrix the top guitarist on its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003.

Wind Cries Mary

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/Jimi_Hendrix-Wind_cries_mary.flv[/flv]

After all the jacks are in their boxes,
and the clowns have all gone to bed,
you can hear happiness staggering on down the street,
footprints dress in red.

And the wind whispers Mary.

A broom is drearily sweeping
up the broken pieces of yesterday’s life.
Somewhere a Queen is weeping,
somewhere a King has no wife.

And the wind it cries Mary.

The traffic lights they turn blue tomorrow
And shine their emptiness down on my bed,
The tiny island sags downstream
‘Cos the life that they lived is dead.

And the wind screams Mary.

Will the wind ever remember
The names it has blown in the past,
And with this crutch, its old age and its wisdom
It whispers, “No, this will be the last.”

And The Wind Cries Mary.

  • Audio from the 1967 Are You Experienced? album:

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