Artist: Nancy Sinatra

Somethin’ Stupid ~ Frank and Nancy Sinatra

Francis Albert “Frank” Sinatra, was an American singer and film actor of Italian origin.

Beginning his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra became an unprecedentedly successful solo artist from the early to mid-1940s, after being signed to Columbia Records in 1943. Being the idol of the “bobby soxers”, he released his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946. His professional career had stalled by the 1950s, but it was reborn in 1953 after he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity.

He signed with Capitol Records in 1953 and released several critically lauded albums (such as In the Wee Small Hours, Songs for Swingin’ Lovers, Come Fly with Me, Only the Lonely and Nice ‘n’ Easy). Sinatra left Capitol to found his own record label, Reprise Records in 1961 (finding success with albums such as Ring-a-Ding-Ding!, Sinatra at the Sands and Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim), toured internationally, was a founding member of the Rat Pack and fraternized with celebrities and statesmen, including John F. Kennedy. Sinatra turned 50 in 1965, recorded the retrospective September of My Years, starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, and scored hits with “Strangers in the Night” and “My Way”.

With sales of his music dwindling and after appearing in several poorly received films, Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971. Two years later, however, he came out of retirement and in 1973 recorded several albums, scoring a Top 40 hit with “(Theme From) New York, New York” in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally, until a short time before his death in 1998.

Sinatra also forged a highly successful career as a film actor, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity, a nomination for Best Actor for The Man with the Golden Arm, and critical acclaim for his performance in The Manchurian Candidate. He also starred in such musicals as High Society, Pal Joey, Guys and Dolls and On the Town. Sinatra was honored at the Kennedy Center Honors in 1983 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1997. Sinatra was also the recipient of eleven Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Trustees Award, Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

Nancy Sandra Sinatra is an American singer and actress. She is the daughter of singer/actor Frank Sinatra, and remains best known for her 1966 signature hit “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’”.

Other defining recordings include “Sugar Town”, the 1967 number one “Somethin’ Stupid” (a duet with her father), the title song from the James Bond film You Only Live Twice, several collaborations with Lee Hazlewood such as “Jackson”, and her cover of Cher’s “Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)”, which features during the opening sequence of Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill.

Nancy Sinatra began her career as a singer and actress in the early 1960s, but initially achieved success only in Europe and Japan. In early 1966 she had a transatlantic number-one hit with “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’”, which showed her provocative but good-natured style, and which popularized and made her synonymous with go-go boots. The promo clip featured a big-haired Sinatra and six young women in tight tops, go-go boots and mini-skirts. The song was written by Lee Hazlewood, who wrote and produced most of her hits and sang with her on several duets, including the critical and cult favorite “Some Velvet Morning”. In 1966 and 1967, Sinatra charted with 13 titles, all of which featured Billy Strange as arranger and conductor.

Sinatra also had a brief acting career in the mid-60s including a co-starring role with Elvis Presley in the movie Speedway, and with Peter Fonda in The Wild Angels.

Somethin’ Stupid

Somethin’ Stupid” is a song written by C. Carson Parks and originally recorded in 1966 by Parks and his wife Gaile Foote, as “Carson and Gaile”.

In the early 1960s, Carson Parks was a folk singer in Los Angeles. He was an occasional member of The Easy Riders, and also performed with The Steeltown Three, which included his younger brother Van Dyke Parks. In 1963 he formed the Greenwood Country Singers, later known as The Greenwoods, who had two minor hits and included singer Gaile Foote. Before the Greenwoods disbanded, Parks and Foote married and, as Carson and Gaile, recorded an album for Kapp Records, San Antonio Rose, which included the track “Something Stupid”. The recording was then brought to the attention of Frank Sinatra.

The most successful and best known version of the song was issued by Frank and Nancy Sinatra on Frank’s album The World We Knew. Frank Sinatra played Parks’ recording to his daughter Nancy’s producer, Lee Hazlewood, who recalled “He asked me, ‘Do you like it?’ and I said, ‘I love it, and if you don’t sing it with Nancy, I will.’ He said, ‘We’re gonna do it, book a studio.’” Their rendition was recorded on February 1, 1967. Al Casey played guitar on the recording. Some sources credit Claus Ogerman as having done the arrangement of the song; others, Billy Strange.

The song spent four weeks at #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and nine weeks atop the easy listening (now adult contemporary) chart, becoming Mr. Sinatra’s second gold single as certified by the RIAA and Ms. Sinatra’s third. It was the first and only instance of a father-daughter number-one song in America. The single also reached #1 on the UK Singles Chart the same year. Because of the song’s intimate nature, this single is sometimes unofficially referred to as “The Incest Song”.

I know I stand in line,
Until you think you have the time
To spend an evening with me
And if we go someplace to dance,
I know that there’s a chance
You won’t be leaving with me

And afterwards we drop into
A quiet little place
And have a drink or two
And then I go and spoil it all,
By saying something stupid
Like “I love you”.

I can see it in your eyes,
That you despise the same old lies
You heard the night before
And though it’s just a line to you,
For me it’s true
It never seemed so right before

I practice every day to find
Some clever lines to say
To make the meaning come through
But then I think I’ll wait until
The evening gets late
And I’m alone with you

The time is right
Your perfume fills my head,
The stars get red
And oh the night’s so blue
And then I go and spoil it all,
By saying something stupid
Like “I love you”.

  • Audio from the 1967 album, The World We Knew:
Click to Purchase

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Some Velvet Morning ~ Lee Hazlewood and Nancy Sinatra

Lee Hazlewood was an American country and pop singer, songwriter, and record producer, most widely known for his work with guitarist Duane Eddy during the late fifties and singer Nancy Sinatra in the sixties.

Hazlewood had a distinctive baritone voice that added an ominous resonance to his music. Hazlewood’s collaborations with Nancy Sinatra as well as his solo output in the late 1960s and early 1970s have been praised as an essential contribution to a sound often described as “Cowboy Psychedelia” or “Saccharine Underground”.

Nancy Sinatra is an American singer and actress. She is the daughter of singer/actor Frank Sinatra from his first wife, Nancy Barbato, and remains known for her 1966 signature hit “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’”. The song was written by Lee Hazlewood, who wrote and produced most of her hits and sang with her on several duets, including “Some Velvet Morning”.

Some Velvet Morning

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Some velvet mornin’ when I’m straight
I’m gonna open up your gate
And maybe tell you ’bout Phaedra
And how she gave me life
And how she made it end
Some velvet mornin’ when I’m straight

Flowers growing on a hill, dragonflies and daffodils
Learn from us very much, look at us but do not touch
Phaedra is my name

Some velvet mornin’ when I’m straight
I’m gonna open up your gate
And maybe tell you ’bout Phaedra
And how she gave me life
And how she made it end
Some velvet mornin’ when I’m straight

Flowers are the things we know, secrets are the things we grow
Learn from us very much, look at us but do not touch
Phaedra is my name

Some velvet mornin’ when I’m straight
Flowers growing on a hill
I’m gonna open up your gate
dragonflies and daffodils
And maybe tell you ’bout Phaedra
Learn from us very much
And how she gave me life
look at us but do not touch
And how she made it end

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