Artist: The Rolling Stones

Angie ~ The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones are an English rock band. The band formed in 1962 in London when original leader Brian Jones and pianist Ian Stewart were joined by vocalist Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards, whose songwriting partnership later contributed to their taking the leadership role in the group. Bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts completed the early lineup. Ian Stewart was removed from the official lineup in 1963 but continued to work with the band as road manager and keyboardist until his death in 1985

The band’s early recordings were mainly covers of American blues and R&B songs. After first achieving success in the UK, they became popular in the US during the “British Invasion” of the early 1960s. Their 1965 single “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” established The Rolling Stones as a premier rock and roll act. Starting with their 1966 album Aftermath, the songs of Jagger and Richards, aided by the instrumental experimentation of Jones, expanded an always-present stylistic flexibility. Jones died in 1969 shortly after being fired from the band and was replaced by Mick Taylor. Taylor recorded five studio albums with The Rolling Stones before quitting in 1974. Former Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood stepped in and has been with the band ever since. Wyman left the Rolling Stones in 1993; bassist Darryl Jones, who is not an official band member, has worked with the group since 1994.

The Rolling Stones have released 22 studio albums in the UK (24 in the US), eight concert albums (nine in the US) and numerous compilations; and have sold more than 200 million albums worldwide. Sticky Fingers (1971) began a string of eight consecutive studio albums that charted at number one in the United States. In 1989 The Rolling Stones were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2004 they were ranked number 4 in Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. Their image of unkempt and surly youth is one that many musicians still emulate.

Angie

Recorded in November and December 1972, “Angie” was written primarily by Keith Richards. The song is an acoustic guitar driven ballad which tells of the end of a romance. The song is noted for its poignant lyrics concerning lost love and the grieving involved. Singer Mick Jagger gives a wrenching performance for the recording, while Stones-recording regular Nicky Hopkins plays the song’s distinctive piano chords.

Questions about the song’s origins have never ceased. Despite wide-ranging rumors that “Angie” was written by Jagger about a relationship he had with David Bowie’s wife Angela, Jagger denies this. Richards claims to have come up with the title and chord sequence a year before production on the album began.

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/angie.flv[/flv]

Angie, Angie, when will those clouds all disappear?
Angie, Angie, where will it lead us from here?
With no loving in our souls and no money in our coats
You can’t say we’re satisfied
But Angie, Angie, you can’t say we never tried
Angie, you’re beautiful, but ain’t it time we said good-bye?
Angie, I still love you, remember all those nights we cried?
All the dreams we held so close seemed to all go up in smoke
Let me whisper in your ear:
Angie, Angie, where will it lead us from here?

Oh, Angie, don’t you weep, all your kisses still taste sweet
I hate that sadness in your eyes
But Angie, Angie, ain’t it time we said good-bye?
With no loving in our souls and no money in our coats
You can’t say we’re satisfied
But Angie, I still love you, baby
Ev’rywhere I look I see your eyes
There ain’t a woman that comes close to you
Come on Baby, dry your eyes
But Angie, Angie, ain’t it good to be alive?
Angie, Angie, they can’t say we never tried

  • Audio from the 1973 album, Goats Head Soup:

album-goats-head-soup
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Sympathy for the Devil ~ The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones are an English rock band. The band formed in 1962 in London when original leader Brian Jones and pianist Ian Stewart were joined by vocalist Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards, whose songwriting partnership later contributed to their taking the leadership role in the group. Bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts completed the early lineup. Ian Stewart was removed from the official lineup in 1963 but continued to work with the band as road manager and keyboardist until his death in 1985

The band’s early recordings were mainly covers of American blues and R&B songs. After first achieving success in the UK, they became popular in the US during the “British Invasion” of the early 1960s. Their 1965 single “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” established The Rolling Stones as a premier rock and roll act. Starting with their 1966 album Aftermath, the songs of Jagger and Richards, aided by the instrumental experimentation of Jones, expanded an always-present stylistic flexibility. Jones died in 1969 shortly after being fired from the band and was replaced by Mick Taylor. Taylor recorded five studio albums with The Rolling Stones before quitting in 1974. Former Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood stepped in and has been with the band ever since. Wyman left the Rolling Stones in 1993; bassist Darryl Jones, who is not an official band member, has worked with the group since 1994.

The Rolling Stones have released 22 studio albums in the UK (24 in the US), eight concert albums (nine in the US) and numerous compilations; and have sold more than 200 million albums worldwide. Sticky Fingers (1971) began a string of eight consecutive studio albums that charted at number one in the United States. In 1989 The Rolling Stones were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2004 they were ranked number 4 in Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. Their image of unkempt and surly youth is one that many musicians still emulate.

Sympathy for the Devil

“Sympathy for the Devil” was written by singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards, though the song was largely a Jagger composition. In a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone, Jagger said, “I think that was taken from an old idea of Baudelaire’s, I think, but I could be wrong. Sometimes when I look at my Baudelaire books, I can’t see it in there. But it was an idea I got from French writing. And I just took a couple of lines and expanded on it. I wrote it as sort of like a Bob Dylan song.” In actuality at certain points the lyrics bear a striking resemblance to Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel The Master and Margarita (see below). It was Richards who suggested changing the tempo and using additional percussion, turning the folk song into a samba.

The working title of the song was “The Devil Is My Name”, and it is sung by Jagger as a first-person narrative from the point of view of Lucifer:

“Please allow me to introduce myself, I’m a man of wealth and taste;”

These opening lines reflect Jagger’s direct inspiration by The Master and Margarita, with the book opening with the similar “‘Please excuse me,’ he said, speaking correctly, but with a foreign accent, ‘for presuming to speak to you without an introduction.’” More references to the book are made in

“I was round when Jesus Christ had his moment of doubt and pain/ Made damn sure that Pilate washed his hands and sealed his fate;”

as this Bible passage is mentioned in the first chapters of “The Master and Margarita”

Backed by an intensifying rock arrangement, the narrator, with chilling narcissistic relish, recounts his exploits over the course of human history and warns the listener: “If you meet me, have some courtesy, have some sympathy, and some taste; use all your well-learned politesse, or I’ll lay your soul to waste.” Jagger stated in the Rolling Stone interview: “…it’s a very long historical figure — the figures of evil and figures of good — so it is a tremendously long trail he’s made as personified in this piece.”

At the time of the release of Beggars Banquet the Rolling Stones had already raised some hackles for sexually forward lyrics such as “Let’s Spend the Night Together”  and for allegedly dabbling in Satanism  (their previous album, while containing no direct Satanic references, had been titled Their Satanic Majesties Request), and “Sympathy” brought these concerns to the fore, provoking media rumors and fears among some religious groups that The Rolling Stones were devil-worshippers and a corrupting influence on youth. The lyrics’ focus, however, is on atrocities in the history of mankind, including European wars of religion (“I watched with glee while your kings and queens fought for ten decades for the Gods they made”), the violence of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the 1918 massacre of the Romanov family (“I stuck around St. Petersburg when I saw it was a time for a change, killed the Tsar and his ministers – Anastasia screamed in vain”) and World War II (“I rode a tank, held a general’s rank when the Blitzkrieg raged and the bodies stank”).

The lyrics also refer to the assassinations of John and Robert Kennedy. The recording sessions for the track were in progress when the latter was killed, and the words were changed from “Who killed Kennedy?” to “who killed the Kennedys?” These lyrics are also a bit of word play on one of the most famous passages by philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in his book The Gay Science where, in section 125, entitled “The Madman” he writes:

“The insane man jumped into their midst and transfixed them with his glances. ‘Where is God gone?’ he called out. ‘I mean to tell you! We have killed him, — you and I!’”

[flv]http://djallyn.org/media/rolling_stones-sympathyforthedevil.flv[/flv]

Please allow me to introduce myself
I’m a man of wealth and taste
I’ve been around for long, long years
Stole many man’s soul and faith

And I was ’round when Jesus Christ
Had his moment of doubt and pain
Made damn sure that Pilate
Washed his hands and sealed his fate

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name
But what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game

I stuck around St. Petersburg
When I saw it was a time for a change
Killed the Czar and his ministers
Anastasia screamed in vain

I rode a tank
Held a general’s rank
When the blitzkrieg raged
And the bodies stank

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name, oh yeah
Ah, what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, oh yeah
(woo woo, woo woo)

I watched with glee
While your kings and queens
Fought for ten decades
For the gods they made
(woo woo, woo woo)

I shouted out,
“Who killed the Kennedys?”
When after all
It was you and me
(who who, who who)

Let me please introduce myself
I’m a man of wealth and taste
And I laid traps for troubadours
Who get killed before they reached Bombay
(woo woo, who who)

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
(who who)
But what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, oh yeah, get down, baby
(who who, who who)

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, oh yeah
But what’s confusing you
Is just the nature of my game
(woo woo, who who)

Just as every cop is a criminal
And all the sinners saints
As heads is tails
Just call me Lucifer
‘Cause I’m in need of some restraint
(who who, who who)

So if you meet me
Have some courtesy
Have some sympathy, and some taste
(woo woo)
Use all your well-learned politesse
Or I’ll lay your soul to waste, um yeah
(woo woo, woo woo)

Pleased to meet you
Hope you guessed my name, um yeah
(who who)
But what’s puzzling you
Is the nature of my game, um mean it, get down
(woo woo, woo woo)

Woo, who
Oh yeah, get on down
Oh yeah
Oh yeah!
(woo woo)

Tell me baby, what’s my name
Tell me honey, can ya guess my name
Tell me baby, what’s my name
I tell you one time, you’re to blame

Oh, who
woo, woo
Woo, who
Woo, woo
Woo, who, who
Woo, who, who
Oh, yeah

What’s my name
Tell me, baby, what’s my name
Tell me, sweetie, what’s my name

Woo, who, who
Woo, who, who
Woo, who, who
Woo, who, who
Woo, who, who
Woo, who, who
Oh, yeah
Woo woo
Woo woo

  • Audio from the 1968 album, Beggars Banquet:

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