DJ’s Fantabulous Jukebox

I cannot promote this Jukebox enough… Bookmark it, it will operate as a “standalone”. New songs added at least once daily.

Do You Feel Like We Do ~ Peter Frampton


peter-framtonPeter Frampton is a British/American musician, singer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. He was previously associated with the bands Humble Pie and The Herd, among others.

Frampton first became interested in music when he was only seven years old. He discovered his grandmother’s banjolele (a banjo-shaped ukulele) in the attic. Teaching himself to play, he became near-obsessed, and upon receiving a guitar and piano, from his parents, taught himself those instruments as well. At age eight he started taking classical music lessons.

Early influences were Cliff Richard & The Shadows (featuring guitarist Hank Marvin) and American rockers Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran, and then the Ventures and the Beatles. His father introduced him to Belgian gypsy jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt.

By the age of ten, Frampton played in a band called The Little Ravens. Both he and David Bowie were pupils at Bromley Technical School where Frampton’s father, Owen Frampton, was an art teacher and head of the Art department. The Little Ravens played on the same bill at school as Bowie’s band, George and the Dragons. Peter and David would spend time together at lunch breaks, playing Buddy Holly songs.

At the age of 11, Peter was playing with a band called The Trubeats followed by a band called The Preachers, produced and managed by Bill Wyman of The Rolling Stones.

He became a successful child singer, and in 1966, he became a member of The Herd. He was the lead guitarist and singer, scoring a handful of British teenybopper hits. Frampton was named “The Face of 1968” by the UK press.

In early 1969, when Frampton was 18 years old, he joined with Steve Marriott of The Small Faces to form Humble Pie.

While playing with Humble Pie, Frampton also did session recording with other artists, including: Harry Nilsson, Jim Price, Jerry Lee Lewis, as well as George Harrison’s solo “All Things Must Pass”, in 1971, and John Entwistle’s “Whistle Rymes”, in 1972. During the Harrison session he was introduced to the ‘talk box’ that has become his trademark guitar sound.

In June 1978, Frampton was involved in a near fatal car accident in the Bahamas, suffering multiple broken bones, concussion and muscle damage. Dealing with the pain of the accident contributed to a brief problem with drug abuse.

Do You Feel Like We Do

“Do You Feel Like We Do” is a song by Peter Frampton originally appearing on the Frampton’s Camel album that he released in 1973. The song became one of the highlights of his live performances in the following years, and it became one of the three hit singles released from his Frampton Comes Alive! album, released in 1976. The live version was recorded at the State University of New York Plattsburgh’s Memorial Hall.  This live version is featured in Guitar Hero 5 and as downloadable content for Rock Band 3.

The song was written and composed in the early 1970s with members of Frampton’s band, then called “Frampton’s Camel.” It was released on the 1973 Frampton’s Camel album. This version was relatively short, at least compared to the whopping duration of the live version (approximately 14 minutes), with the studio recording totaling 6 minutes and 44 seconds, and it was not released as a single.

After the lack of success of his “Camel,” Frampton performed under his own name and began touring the United States extensively for the next two years, supporting acts such as The J. Geils Band and ZZ Top, as well as performing his own shows at smaller venues. As a result, he developed a strong live following while his albums sold moderately and his singles failed to chart.

“Do You Feel Like We Do” became the closing number of his set and one of the highlights of his show. His concert version was considerably longer, with the version recorded on “Frampton Comes Alive!” alone exceeding 14 minutes, 4 of which are spent in the rock intro, 4 in the loud rock subito fortissimo outro, and 6 in the long, quiet bridge, featuring several instrumental solos utilizing Bob Mayo’s keyboard and Frampton’s guitar and talk box skills (see below). Most famously of these were the aforementioned talk box solos, which were performed using an effects pedal that redirects a guitar’s sound through a tube into the performer’s mouth, allowing the guitar to mimic human speech, similarly to a vocoder. Following the success of the talk box solos, Frampton subsequently marketed such talk boxes under his own “Framptone” brand. To this day, Frampton is considered an exemplary talk box performer, with his solos arguably being the selling point of some of his albums and songs.

As a result of the strength of Frampton’s live show, A&M Records decided to release a live album taped when Frampton performed at Winterland in San Francisco.Frampton Comes Alive! was originally going to be a single album until Jerry Moss asked, “Where’s the rest?”  “Do You Feel Like We Do” was one of the tracks added to the album as a result of the decision to expand the album into a double album. The selection had been recorded live on November 22, 1975 on the college campus of SUNY Plattsburgh in Plattsburgh, New York.

“Do You Feel Like We Do” was released as the third single from Frampton Comes Alive! in September 1976. On September 8, U.S. President Gerald Ford invited him to stay at the White House as a result of the success of Frampton Comes Alive! It was edited down extensively for the 45 RPM single and promo single for pop radio stations, but the said single version was still 7 minutes long. Many radio stations were known to edit the song down even further, to make it fit into the then-tightly-programmed AM radio formats. It reached number 10 on the US pop charts and number 39 in the UK, making it one of the longest songs to reach the US top 10.

Many album-oriented rock stations played the full 14 minute length version, most notably WBCN in Boston, Massachusetts. WBCN is credited with being the first album rock station to play the full length of the album on air.

The title of the song is “Do You Feel Like We Do,” although the lyrics read, “Do you feel like I do?” Only after Bob Mayo’s keyboard solo in the Frampton Comes Alive!version does Frampton sing, “Do you feel like we do?” He then sings “Do you feel like we do?” through the talk box in the midst of his extended guitar solo.

Do You Feel Like We Do – Frampton

Woke up this morning
With a wine glass in my hand
Whose wine, what wine?
Where the hell did I dine?

Must have been a dream
I don’t believe where I’ve been
Come on let’s do it again

Do you, you feel like I do?
Do you, you feel like I do?

My friend got busted just the other day
They said don’t walk
Don’t walk, don’t walk away

He drove into a taxi bent the boot hit the back
Had to play some music
Otherwise he’d crack

Do you, you feel like I do?
Do you, you feel like I do?

Do you, you feel like I do?
How do you feel?
Do you, you feel like I do?

Champagne for breakfast
And a sherman in my hand
Bright top, blue tails it never fails

Must have been a dream
I don’t believe where I’ve been
Come on let’s do it again?

Do you, you feel like I do?
Do you, you feel like I?

Yeah, do you feel like we do?
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

  • Audio from the 1976 album, Frampton Comes Alive:


Play Do You Feel Like We Do - by Peter Frampton

Started Out With Nothin’ – Seasick Steve

seasick-steveSteven Gene Wold, commonly known as Seasick Steve is an American bluesman, although he prefers to be called “a song and dance man”. He plays guitars (mostly personalized), and sings, usually about his early life living rough and doing casual work.

Wold was born in Oakland, California.When he was four years old, his parents split up. His father played boogie-woogie piano and at five or six years old Wold tried to learn but could not. At age eight, he learned to play the guitar (he later found out that it was blues) from K. C. Douglas, who worked at his grandfather’s garage.Douglas wrote the song “Mercury Blues” and used to play with Tommy Johnson. Wold left home at 13 to avoid abuse at the hands of his stepfather, and lived rough and on the road in Tennessee, Mississippi and elsewhere, until 1973. He would travel long distances by hopping freight trains, looking for work as a farm laborer or in other seasonal jobs, often living as a hobo. At various times, Wold worked as a carnie, cowboy and a migrant worker.

Of this time he once said:

“Hobos are people who move around looking for work, tramps are people who move around but don’t look for work, and bums are people who don’t move and don’t work. I’ve been all three.”

In the sixties he started touring and performing with fellow blues musicians, and had friends in the music scene including Janis Joplin and Joni Mitchell. Since then, he has worked, on and off, as a session musician and studio engineer. In the late 1980s, while living in Olympia, near Seattle, he worked with many indie label artistsKurt Cobain was a friend. In the 1990s he continued to work as a recording engineer and producer, including producing several releases by Modest Mouse. including their 1996 debut album This Is a Long Drive for Someone with Nothing to Think About.

At one time, living in Paris, Wold made his living busking, mostly on the metro. After moving to Norway in 2001, Wold released his first album, entitled “Cheap”, recorded with The Level Devils (Jo Husmo on stand-up bass and Kai Kristoffersen on drums) as his rhythm section. His debut solo album, “Dog House Music” was released by Bronzerat Records in November 2006, after he was championed by an old friend, Joe Cushley, DJ on the Ballin’ The Jack blues show on London radio station Resonance FM.

Started Out With Nothin’

Started Out With Nothin’ – Wold

I can’t lose what I never had
You can’t take what I ain’t got
When I’m happy, you won’t make me sad
Depending on you all
Well I’m not
Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left

When I’m down I just get up
When I’m down well I stand up
Been down many times well you know it’s true
Haven’t had a red dime between me and you

Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left
Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left
Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left

And if all fell apart today
I could just walk
Get on down the street
I ain’t worried where I’m going to sleep
I can always find some food to eat

Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left
Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left
Cause I started out with nothing
and I’ve still got most of it left

  • Audio from the 2008 album, Started Out With Nothin’:


Play Started Out With Nothing - by Seasick Steve

Little Lion Man ~ Mumford & Sons

mumford-and-sons-bb11-2015-billboard-04-650Mumford & Sons are an English folk rock band. The band is made up of Marcus Mumford (vocals, guitar, drums, mandolin), Ben Lovett (vocals, keyboards, accordion), “Country” Winston Marshall (vocals, banjo, dobro), and Ted Dwane (vocals, string bass). Although the band members have claims on certain instruments, the members switch instruments during live shows according to convenience, for they each play a variety of instruments. The band formed in late 2007, rising out of London’s folk scene with other artists such as Laura Marling, Johnny Flynn, Jay Jay Pistolet and Noah and the Whale.

The band has often supported Laura Marling at concerts, while their association with Noah and the Whale can be traced back to St Paul’s School, Barnes and King’s College School, Wimbledon. Mumford and Lovett attended King’s College School alongside Noah and the Whale bassist Matt Owens, while Marshall attended St Paul’s School along with Charlie Fink, lead singer of Noah and the Whale.

Little Lion Man

Little Lion Man” is the debut single by London folk quartet Mumford & Sons released from their debut studio album, Sigh No More.

Frontman Marcus Mumford has said about the song:

It’s a very personal story, so I won’t elaborate upon too much. Suffice to say, it was a situation in my life I wasn’t very happy with or proud of… and sometimes when you can’t describe a feeling with your own words, it’s almost easier to express in a song. And then, when you get asked about the songs, it’s quite difficult to explain. It’s a conundrum – you don’t want to seem self-indulgent explaining yourself; it’s always awkward. Which is weird again, because it’s never awkward actually singing them. I suppose the song should stand on its own and people draw their own interpretation from the words. But for me, personally, it’s the lyrics that I listen to again and again in a song. I place specific importance on them. I can’t write lyrics unless I really feel them and mean them, which can sometimes be quite frustrating – because if you’re not feeling much at the time, you’re stuck.

I guess the sound of it grabs you a little bit by the balls – it’s quite an aggressive song, a bit more of a punch in the face. Or at least, for our stuff, anyway – a lot of our stuff isn’t quite as hard-hitting as that. It felt like the right song to be the single because it represented the harder, darker side of what we do, and at the same time, the more folksy and punchy side.”

Little Lion Man – Marcus Mumford

Weep for yourself, my man,
You’ll never be what is in your heart
Weep little lion man,
You’re not as brave as you were at the start
Rate yourself and rake yourself,
Take all the courage you have left
Wasted on fixing all the problems that you made in your own head

But it was not your fault but mine
And it was your heart on the line
I really fucked it up this time
Didn’t I, my dear?

Tremble for yourself, my man,
You know that you have seen this all before
Tremble little lion man,
You’ll never settle any of your scores
Your grace is wasted in your face,
Your boldness stands alone among the wreck
Learn from your mother or else spend your days biting your own neck

But it was not your fault but mine
And it was your heart on the line
I really fucked it up this time
Didn’t I, my dear?

  • Audio from the 2009 album, Sigh No More:


Play Little Lion Man - by Mumford &

Stardog Champion ~ Mother Love Bone

mother-love-boneMother Love Bone was an American rock band that formed in Seattle, Washington in 1988. The band was active from 1988 to 1990. Frontman Andrew Wood’s personality and compositions helped to catapult the group to the top of the burgeoning late 1980s/early 1990s Seattle music scene. Tragically, Wood died only days before the release of the band’s debut album, Apple, thus ending the group’s hopes of success. Although Mother Love Bone is to this day remembered by many as a very talented band in its own right, its legacy, for some, is overshadowed by Wood’s death and the bands that its former members would later form.

Mother Love Bone was established in 1988 by ex-Green River members Stone Gossard, Jeff Ament and Bruce Fairweather, ex-Malfunkshun frontman Andrew Wood and ex-Ten Minute Warning and Skin Yard drummer Greg Gilmore. Initially the group was formed in 1987 out of covers outfit Lords of the Wasteland which featured Wood, Gossard, Ament and Malfunkshun drummer Regan Hagar. By early 1988 the band had added Fairweather, replaced Hagar with drummer Greg Gilmore and changed its name to Mother Love Bone. This new lineup quickly set about recording and playing area shows and by late 1988 had become one of Seattle’s more promising bands.

In early 1989 the band signed to PolyGram subsidiary Mercury Records. As part of its contract PolyGram also created the Stardog Records imprint exclusively for the band. In March of that year the group issued its debut EP, Shine, becoming the first of the new crop of Seattle bands to have a release on a major label. The record sold well and rapidly increased the hype surrounding the band.

In late 1989 the group returned to the studio (this time in Apple. Despite some initial difficulties, the record was on-time for its projected March 1990 release. By this point interest in the band had hit a fever pitch and it seemed destined that the band were going to make it big. Only days before the release of Apple, however, frontman Andrew Wood, who had a long history with drug problems, overdosed on heroin. After spending a few days in the hospital in a coma, Wood died, effectively bringing the group to an end. The album would see release later that year in July.

In the months following Wood’s death, Gossard and Ament would be approached by Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell (who was Andrew Wood’s roommate), and asked if they would be interested in recording a single containing two songs he had written in tribute to Andrew Wood. The project turned into an entire album and the group took the name Temple of the Dog, a reference to a line in the lyrics of a song penned by Wood. After Temple of the Dog, Gossard and Ament founded Pearl Jam along with Mike McCready of Shadow, Eddie Vedder of Bad Radio, and Dave Krusen. Pearl Jam rocketed to fame with its debut album Ten and is still active today. Pearl Jam has released eight albums in total and continues to tour.

Fairweather initially remained inactive but later surfaced in the Seattle based psychedelic rock band Love Battery, replacing Tommy Simpson on bass in 1992. He played on two of the band’s albums and many of its tours before leaving that band as well and dropping off the radar. In 2006, he resurfaced in The Press Corps, with Garret Shavlik (The Fluid) and Dan Peters (Mudhoney).

Gilmore’s profile also dropped significantly following Mother Love Bone’s demise although he did participate in the reunion of his former band Ten Minute Warning in 1998, and was credited with providing ‘inspiration’ for the song “Never the Machine Forever” (credited as being written by Kim Thayil) on Soundgarden’s final studio album, 1996’s Down on the Upside. The song initially came out of a jamming session Thayil had with Gilmore.

Ira Robbins of Entertainment Weekly said, “Mother Love Bone—the band’s total output—suggests a young, hungry Aerosmith hooked on Led Zeppelin.”

The song “Would” by Alice in Chains was written about Andrew Wood.

Stardog Champion

Stardog Champion” is the second song on Mother Love Bone’s self-titled album.

Stardog Champion – Wood

San Francisco, where the flowers bloom in spring
I said, fade to winter – and see what disease brings
Augustino, with his eyes once a shining sea
I said he’s half a shadow – God don’t let that be me
I’m a Stardog Champion

West Virginia, that’s where my father lies
He was a wartime hero, the kind that money buys
It’s a diamond bracelet, for my mommy’s memory
That’s all she wrote boy – that’s all she wrote for me

I’m a Stardog Champion
I’m a Stardog
That’s right

And the children
They used to sing of love
With Grace
From the Lord above
I said the children they used to sing out loud
Sing it loud

  • Audio from the 1998 album, Mother Love Bone:


Play Stardog Champion - by Mother Love Bone

The Needle and the Damage Done ~ Neil Young

neil-youngNeil Young, OC OM  is a Canadian singer-songwriter and musician. He began performing in a group covering Shadows instrumentals in Canada in 1960, before moving to California in 1966, where he co-founded the band Buffalo Springfield together with Stephen Stills and Richie Furay, and later joined Crosby, Stills & Nash in 1969. He released his first album in 1968 and has since forged a successful and acclaimed solo career, spanning over 45 years and 35 studio albums, with a continuous and uncompromising exploration of musical styles. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website describes Young as “one of rock and roll’s greatest songwriters and performers”.  He was inducted into the Hall of Fame twice, first as a solo artist in 1995, and second as a member of Buffalo Springfield in 1997.

Young’s music is characterized by his distinctive guitar work, deeply personal lyrics and characteristic alto or high tenor singing voice. Although he accompanies himself on several different instruments, including piano and harmonica, his idiosyncratic electric and acoustic guitar playing are the defining characteristics of a varyingly ragged and melodic sound.

While Young has experimented with differing music styles throughout a varied career, including electronic music, most of his best known work is either acoustic folk-rock and country rock or electric, amplified hard rock (most often in collaboration with the band Crazy Horse). Musical styles such as alternative rock and grunge also adopted elements from Young. His influence has caused some to dub him the “Godfather of Grunge”.

Young has directed (or co-directed) a number of films using the pseudonym Bernard Shakey, including Journey Through the Past (1973), Rust Never Sleeps (1979), Human Highway (1982), Greendale (2003), and CSNY/Déjà Vu (2008). He has also contributed to the soundtracks of films including Philadelphia (1993) and Dead Man (1995).

Young is an environmentalist and outspoken advocate for the welfare of small farmers, having co-founded in 1985 the benefit concert Farm Aid. He is currently working on a documentary about electric car technology, tentatively titled LincVolt. The project involves his 1959 Lincoln Continental converted to hybrid technology as an environmentalist statement.  In 1986, Young helped found The Bridge School,  an educational organization for children with severe verbal and physical disabilities, and its annual supporting Bridge School Benefit concerts, together with his ex-wife Pegi Young (née Morton). Young has three children: sons Zeke (born during his relationship with actress Carrie Snodgress) and Ben, who were diagnosed with cerebral palsy, and daughter Amber Jean who, like Young, has epilepsy. Young lives on his ranch near La Honda, California. Although he has lived in northern California since the 1970s and sings as frequently about U.S. themes and subjects as he does about his native country, he has retained his Canadian citizenship.  On July 14, 2006, Young was awarded the Order of Manitoba, and on December 30, 2009, was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

The Needle and the Damage Done

The Needle and the Damage Done” is a song by Neil Young that describes the destruction caused by the heroin addiction of musicians he knew. Though not specifically about him, the song was inspired by the heroin addiction of his friend and Crazy Horse bandmate Danny Whitten. It previews the theme of the Tonight’s the Night album that reflects Young’s grief over the heroin overdose and death of both Whitten and Bruce Berry, a roadie for Young and Crazy Horse.

“The Needle and the Damage Done” first appeared on the Harvest album in 1972. Rather than re-recording it, he selected a live version from January 1971. It appeared on the compilation albums Decade and Greatest Hits. On the handwritten liner notes included in Decade, Young had this to say about the song: “I am not a preacher, but drugs killed a lot of great men.”

It appeared on the 2007 album Live at Massey Hall 1971. The album captured Young’s introduction of his song thus:

Ever since I left Canada, about five years ago or so… and moved down south… found out a lot of things that I didn’t know when I left. Some of ’em are good, and some of ’em are bad. Got to see a lot of great musicians before they happened… before they became famous… y’know, when they were just gigging. Five and six sets a night… things like that. And I got to see a lot of, um, great musicians who nobody ever got to see. For one reason or another. But… strangely enough, the real good ones… that you never got to see was… ’cause of, ahhm, heroin. An’ that started happening over an’ over. Then it happened to someone that everyone knew about. So I just wrote a little song.

The Song in Popular Culture

  • The song was the inspiration for The Sisters of Mercy’s first 7″ single, “The Damage Done” (1980).
  • The title was also used as the album title for the second installment of the Nirvana Outcesticide bootleg series (1995).
  • In the ninth episode of the second season of NewsRadio Jimmy remarks to Dave that he’s “…seen the coffee and the damage done,” a reference to Dave’s coffee addiction.
  • Rolling Stone’s cover story on Alice in Chains frontman Layne Staley, a known heroin addict, bears the title (Issue 727).
  • A reference to its title can be found in the song “Understanding in a Car Crash” on the album Full Collapse (2001) by Thursday.
  • A fourth season episode of Homicide: Life on the Street concerning the fallout from a drug war was titled “The Damage Done”.
  • “Song to Say Goodbye” from the Placebo album Meds (2006) includes the lyrical reference “your needle and your damage done”.
  • In 1994, several prison guards in Idaho were accused of playing this song to taunt death row inmates during a scheduled lethal injection.
  • A reference to the title appears in the song “Genetic Design For Dying” from Aiden’s album Nightmare Anatomy (2005)
  • In 1997, the Skylab remix of the Depeche Mode song “Home” was titled “Home (The Noodles & The Damage Done)”.
  • In a 2012 episode of New Girl (TV Series), “Bully”, Max Greenfield’s character Schmidt references the song, saying “Schmiddle and the damage done. Yo Neil Young.” to his lover.
  • British Artist Pete Fowler’s August 2013 solo exhibition, at Beach London Gallery, of cross-stich embroidery was titled ‘The Needle and The Damage Done’
  • The title of this song was used by former Heroes del Silencio singer Enrique Bunbury in his 2009 album Las Consecuencias in the song “Los Habitantes”.
  • A horror novel called “MILK-BLOOD”, based on the song lyrics, was published in June of 2014.

The Needle and the Damage Done ~ Young
I caught you knockin’
at my cellar door
I love you, baby,
can I have some more
Ooh, ooh, the damage done.

I hit the city and
I lost my band
I watched the needle
take another man
Gone, gone, the damage done.

I sing the song
because I love the man
I know that some
of you don’t understand
to keep from running out.

I’ve seen the needle
and the damage done
A little part of it in everyone
But every junkie’s
like a settin’ sun.

  • Audio from the 1972 album, Harvest:


Play The Needle and the Damage Done - by Neil Young

Hand In My Pocket ~ Alanis Morissette

20120823-alanis-624x420-1345730558Alanis Nadine Morissette  is a Canadian-American alternative rock singer-songwriter, guitarist, record producer, and actress. She has won 16 Juno Awards and sevenGrammy Awards throughout her career. Morissette began her career in Canada, and as a teenager recorded two dance-pop albums, Alanis (1991) and Now Is the Time (1992), under MCA Records Canada. Her first international album was the rock-influenced Jagged Little Pill, released in 1995. Jagged has sold more than 33 million units globally. Her following album, Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, was released in 1998.

Morissette took up producing duties for her subsequent albums, which include Under Rug Swept (2002), So-Called Chaos (2004), and Flavors of Entanglement (2008). Her eighth studio album, Havoc and Bright Lights, was released in 2012. Morissette has sold more than 60 million albums worldwide. Morissette is also known for her powerful and emotive mezzo-soprano voice.  She has been dubbed by Rolling Stone as the “Queen of alt-rock angst”

Morissette was born June 1, 1974, in Ottawa, Canada  to teacher Georgia Mary Ann (née Feuerstein) and high-school principal Alan Richard Morissette.   She has two siblings: older brother Chad is a business entrepreneur,  and twin brother (12 minutes older) Wade is a musician.  Her father was of French and Irish descent and her mother had Hungarian ancestry. Her parents were teachers in a military school and due to their work often had to move. From 1977 to 1980 Morissette spent three years of her childhood in Germany. When she was six years old, she returned to Ottawa and started to play the piano. In 1981, when she was seven years old, she began dance lessons.   Morissette had a Catholic upbringing.  She attended Holy Family Catholic School for elementary school  and Immaculata High School for Grades 7 and 8  before completing the rest of her high school at Glebe Collegiate Institute (Ottawa, Canada). She appeared on the children’s television show You Can’t Do That on Television for five episodes when she was in elementary school.

In 1993, Morissette’s publisher Leeds Levy at MCA Music Publishing introduced her to manager Scott Welch.  Welch told HitQuarters he was impressed by her “spectacular voice”, her character and her lyrics. At the time she was still living at home with her parents. Together they decided it would be best for her career to move to Toronto and start writing with other people.  After graduating from high school, Morissette moved from Ottawa to Toronto.  Her publisher funded part of her development and when she met producer and songwriter Glen Ballard, he believed in her talent enough to let her use his studio.  The two wrote and recorded Morissette’s first internationally released album, Jagged Little Pill, and by the spring of 1995, she had signed a deal with Maverick Records. In the same year she learned how to play guitar. According to manager Welch every label they had approached had passed on Morissette apart from Maverick.

Maverick Records released Jagged Little Pill internationally in 1995. The album was expected only to sell enough for Morissette to make a follow-up, but the situation changed quickly whenKROQ-FM, an influential Los Angeles modern rock radio station, began playing “You Oughta Know”, the album’s first single.  The song instantly garnered attention for its scathing, explicit lyrics, and a subsequent music video went into heavy rotation on MTV and MuchMusic.

After the success of “You Oughta Know”, the album’s other hit singles helped send Jagged Little Pill to the top of the charts. “All I Really Want” and “Hand in My Pocket” followed, but the fourth U.S. single, “Ironic”, became Morissette’s biggest hit. “You Learn” and “Head over Feet”, the fifth and sixth singles, respectively, kept Jagged Little Pill (1995) in the top twenty on theBillboard 200 albums chart for more than a year. According to the RIAA, Jagged Little Pill sold more than 16 million copies in the U.S.; it sold 33 million worldwide,  making it the second biggest selling album by a female artist (behind Shania Twain’s Come On Over).  Morissette’s popularity grew significantly in Canada, where the album was certified twelve times platinum  and produced four RPM chart-toppers: “Hand in My Pocket”, “Ironic”, “You Learn”, and “Head over Feet”. The album was also a bestseller in Australia and the United Kingdom.

Morissette’s success with Jagged Little Pill (1995) was credited with leading to the introduction of female singers such as Shakira, Meredith Brooks, and in the early 2000s, Pink and fellow Canadian Avril Lavigne.  She was criticized for collaborating with producer and supposed image-maker Ballard, and her previous albums also proved a hindrance for her respectability.  Morissette and the album won six Juno Awards in 1996: Album of the Year, Single of the Year(“You Oughta Know”), Female Vocalist of the Year, Songwriter of the Year and Best Rock Album.  At the 1996 Grammy Awards, she won Best Female Rock Vocal Performance, Best Rock Song (both for “You Oughta Know”), Best Rock Album and Album of the Year.

Later in 1996, Morissette embarked on an 18-month world tour in support of Jagged Little Pill, beginning in small clubs and ending in large venues. Taylor Hawkins, who later joined the Foo Fighters, was the tour’s drummer. “Ironic” was nominated for two 1997 Grammy Awards — Record of the Year and Best Music Video, Short Form —and won Single of the Year at the 1997 Juno Awards, where Morissette also won Songwriter of the Year and the International Achievement Award. The video Jagged Little Pill, Live, which was co-directed by Morissette and chronicled the bulk of her tour, won a 1998 Grammy Award for Best Music Video, Long Form.

Hand In My Pocket

Hand in my Pocket” is a rock  song by Canadian recording artist and songwriter Alanis Morissette, for her third studio album, Jagged Little Pill (1995). The song was written by Morissette and Glen Ballard, and was released as the second single from the album. The song was released on October 31, 1995, nearly five months after the album release. “Hand in My Pocket” received generally favorable reviews from music critics, who applauded Morissette’s songwriting. “Hand in My Pocket” also received substantial success through radio airplay in the U.S. The song became Morissette’s second number-one hit on Billboard‘s U.S. Modern Rock Tracks chart. The song also went in the top ten in New Zealand and the U.S. An accompanying music video was released for the single, featuring Morissette at a festival, driving her car in black and white form. That received positive reviews as well.

The Song in Popular Culture

“Hand in My Pocket” served as the theme song in the unaired pilot episode of the television show Dawson’s Creek, but Morissette decided not to have it used as the theme after the show was picked up. In 2015 was featured in an episode of American television series, Glee, called “Jagged Little Tapestry”, covered by Naya Rivera and Heather Morris.

Hand in my Pocket – Morissette, Ballard

I’m broke but I’m happy
I’m poor but I’m kind
I’m short but I’m healthy, yeah
I’m high but I’m grounded
I’m sane but I’m overwhelmed
I’m lost but I’m hopeful baby
What it all comes down to
Is that everything’s gonna be fine fine fine
’cause I’ve got one hand in my pocket
And the other one is giving a high five
I feel drunk but I’m sober
I’m young and I’m underpaid
I’m tired but I’m working, yeah
I care but I’m restless
I’m here but I’m really gone
I’m wrong and I’m sorry baby

What it all comes down to
Is that everything’s gonna be quite alright
’cause I’ve got one hand in my pocket
And the other one is flicking a cigarette
And what it all comes down to
Is that I haven’t got it all figured out just yet
’cause I’ve got one hand in my pocket
And the other one is giving the peace sign
I’m free but I’m focused
I’m green but I’m wise
I’m hard but I’m friendly baby
I’m sad but I’m laughing
I’m brave but I’m chickenshit
I’m sick but I’m pretty baby

And what it all boils down to
Is that no one’s really got it figured out just yet
’cause I’ve got one hand in my pocket
And the other one is playing the piano
And what it all comes down to my friends
Is that everything’s just fine fine fine
’cause I’ve got one hand in my pocket
And the other one is hailing a taxi cab

  • Audio from the 1995 album, Jagged Little Pill:


Play Hand In My Pocket - by Alanis Morissette
%d bloggers like this: