Ænema ~ Tool

Tool is an American rock band from Los Angeles, California, formed in 1990. Since their inception, the band’s line-up has included drummer Danny Carey, guitarist Adam Jones, and vocalist Maynard James Keenan. Since 1995, Justin Chancellor has been the band’s bassist, replacing their original bassist Paul D’Amour. Tool is known to have rigorous touring schedules in support of their albums, they have performed well on charts worldwide, and have sold an estimated 9.25 million records in the United States alone.

Tool emerged with a heavy metal sound on their first studio album, Undertow, at a time when the genre was dominated by thrash metal; and later became a dominant act in the alternative metal movement with the release of their second effort, Ænima, in 1996. Their efforts to unify musical experimentation, visual arts, and a message of personal evolution continued with their third album, Lateralus, in 2001; and their most recent album, 10,000 Days, released in 2006, gained the band critical acclaim and success around the world.

Due to Tool’s incorporation of visual arts and relatively long and complex releases, the band is generally described as a style-transcending act and part of progressive rock and art rock. The relationship between the band and today’s music industry is ambivalent, at times marked by censorship and the band members’ insistence on privacy.

Ænema

Ænema” is a song by rock band Tool, released as the third single from their second album Ænima. Adam Jones made a video for the song using stop-motion animation that appears on Salival. The song reached number twenty-five on the U.S. Mainstream Rock Tracks chart in August 1997.

The song makes extensive use of hemiola, a musical technique in which the emphasis in a triple meter is changed to give the illusion that both a duple and a triple meter occur in the song. For example, during the first verse, the beat appears to be in 12/8 timing, while toward the middle of the song when the lyrics from the first verse are repeated, the beat can be perceived as being in 6/8 timing. The double bass drums are played in a triplet using the floor tom in the middle of the song making them seem twice the speed.

Keenan incorporates into the lyrics part of comedian Bill Hicks’ sketch “Arizona Bay” routine (from Hicks’ comedy segment album of the same name) by stating the line “learn to swim, see you down in Arizona Bay.” Hicks appears in the liner notes/sleeve as a doctor, and a lenticular image below the case tray illustrates a large portion of California disappearing leaving only the Pacific Ocean, as is mentioned in the song. California falling into the sea is a prediction made by Edgar Cayce, also known as “The Sleeping Prophet,” about the end of days in which California and New York are to sink into the ocean among a plethora of other devastating weather changes.

It also refers to the Church of Scientology with the line “Fuck L. Ron Hubbard and fuck all his clones”; this is because the band members of Tool are opposed to Scientology.

Ænema – Tool

Some say the end is near.
Some say we’ll see Armageddon soon.
I certainly hope we will.
I sure could use a vacation from this
bull-shit, three brained, circus, side-show of freaks
here in this hopeless fucking hole we call LA.
The only way to fix it is to flush it all away.
Any fucking time, any fucking day.
Learn to swim, see you down in Arizona Bay.

Fret for your figure and
Fret for your latte and
Fret for your lawsuit and
Fret for your hair-piece and
Fret for your prozac and
Fret for your pilot and
Fret for your contract and
Fret for your car.

It’s a bull-shit, three-ring, circus, side-show of freaks
here in this hopeless fucking hole we call LA.
The only way to fix it is to flush it all away.
Any fucking time, any fucking day.
Learn to swim, see you down in Arizona Bay.

Some say a comet will fall from the sky,
Followed by meteor showers and tidal waves,
Followed by fault lines that can not sit still,
Followed by millions of dumb-founded dipshits.

And some say the end is near.
Some say we’ll see Armageddon soon.
I certainly hope we will.
I sure could use a vacation from this,
Stupid shit.
Silly shit.
Stupid shit.

One great big festering neon distraction,
I’ve a suggestion to keep you all occupied.
Learn to swim. Learn to swim. Learn to swim.

Mom’s gonna fix it all soon.
Mom’s coming round to put it back the way it oughta be.

Fuck L. Ron Hubbard,
And fuck all his clones.
Fuck all these gun toting,
Hip-gangster wannabies.

Fuck retro anything,
Fuck your tattoos.
Fuck all you junkies and
Fuck your short memory.

Fuck smiley glad-hands, with hidden agendas.
Fuck these dysfunctional, insecure actresses.

I’m praying for rain,
I’m praying for tidal waves,
I wanna see the ground give way,
I wanna watch it all go down,
Mom please flush it all away,
I wanna see it go right in and down,
I wanna watch it go right in,
Watch you flush it all away.

Time to bring it down again.
Don’t just call me pessimist.
Try and read between the lines.

I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t
welcome any change my friend.

I wanna see it come down,
plug it down,
suck it down,
flush it down.

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NOTE:  Tool does not market their singles online.  They will only allow you to buy their songs in album form because that is how they want you to experience their music.
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Black Hole Sun ~ Soundgarden

Soundgarden Google images

Soundgarden is an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington, in 1984 by singer and rhythm guitarist Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. Matt Cameron became the band’s full-time drummer in 1986, while bassist Ben Shepherd became a permanent replacement for Yamamoto in 1990.

Soundgarden was one of the seminal bands in the creation of grunge, a style of alternative rock that developed in Seattle, and was one of a number of grunge bands signed to the record label Sub Pop. Soundgarden was the first grunge band to sign to a major label (A&M Records, in 1988), though the band did not achieve commercial success until they popularized the genre in the early 1990s with Seattle contemporaries Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Alice in Chains.

Soundgarden achieved its biggest success with the 1994 album Superunknown, which debuted at number one on the Billboard charts and yielded theGrammy Award-winning singles “Black Hole Sun” and “Spoonman”. In 1997, the band broke up due to internal strife over its creative direction. After several years working on projects and other bands, Soundgarden reunited in 2010 and their sixth studio album, King Animal, was released two years later.

Soundgarden’s origins can be found in a band called The Shemps, which performed around Seattle in the early 1980s, and featured bassist Hiro Yamamoto and drummer and singer Chris Cornell. Following Yamamoto’s departure, the band recruited guitarist Kim Thayil as its new bassist. Thayil had moved to Seattle from Park Forest, Illinois, with Yamamoto and Bruce Pavitt, who would later start the independent record label Sub Pop. Cornell and Yamamoto stayed in contact, and after The Shemps broke up Cornell and Yamamoto started jamming together, and were eventually joined by Thayil.

A Sound Garden
A Sound Garden

Soundgarden was formed in 1984 by Cornell (drums and vocals), Yamamoto (bass), and Thayil (guitar). The band named themselves after a wind-channeling pipe sculpture, “A Sound Garden”, located on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration property at 7600 Sand Point Way next to Magnuson Park, Seattle. Cornell originally played drums while singing, but in 1985 the band enlisted Scott Sundquist to allow Cornell to concentrate on vocals. The band traveled around playing various concerts with this line-up for about a year. Their first recordings were three songs that appeared on a 1986 compilation album for C/Z Records called Deep Six. It also featured songs by fellow grunge pioneers Green River, Skin Yard, Malfunkshun, The U-Men, and The Melvins. In 1986, Sundquist left the band to spend time with his family, and was replaced by Matt Cameron, the drummer from Skin Yard.

KCMU DJ Jonathan Poneman was impressed after seeing Soundgarden perform one night, later saying, “I saw this band that was everything rock music should be.” Poneman offered to fund a release by the band, so Thayil told him to team up with Bruce Pavitt. Poneman offered to contribute $20,000 in funding for Sub Pop, effectively turning it into a full-fledged record label.Soundgarden signed to Sub Pop, and the label released “Hunted Down” in 1987 as the band’s first single. The B-side of the “Hunted Down” single, “Nothing to Say”, appeared on the KCMU compilation tape Bands That Will Make Money, which was distributed to record companies, many of whom showed interest in Soundgarden. Through Sub Pop, the band released the Screaming Life EP in 1987, and the Fopp EP in 1988. A combination of the two was issued as Screaming Life/Fopp in 1990.

Black Hole Sun

Black Hole Sun” is a song by the American rock band Soundgarden. Written by frontman Chris Cornell, “Black Hole Sun” was released in 1994 as the third single from the band’s fourth studio album Superunknown (1994). It is arguably the band’s most recognizable and most popular song, and remains a well known song from the 1990s. The song topped the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, where it spent a total of seven weeks at number one and despite failing to reach number one and peaking at number two on the Modern Rock Tracks chart, “Black Hole Sun” still finished as the top song on the chart making it the number one Modern Rock Tracks song for the year 1994 being more successful than any other number one Modern Rock Track in 1994. It failed to hit the Billboard Hot 100 chart due to the rules of a physical/commercial release of the single until December 1998 which “Black Hole Sun” was not issued for, but it still peaked at number 24 on the Hot 100 Airplay chart and number nine on the Mainstream Top 40 chart. The song was included on Soundgarden’s 1997 greatest hits album A-Sides and appeared again on the 2010 compilation album Telephantasm.

“Black Hole Sun” was written by frontman Chris Cornell. Cornell said that he wrote the song in about 15 minutes. He used a Gretsch guitar to write the song, and commented, “I wrote the song thinking the band wouldn’t like it—then it became the biggest hit of the summer.” Cornell came up with the song while using a Leslie speaker. Guitarist Kim Thayil said that the Leslie speaker was perfect for the song as “it’s very Beatlesque and has a distinctive sound. It ended up changing the song completely.” Thayil said that the song “wasn’t safe as milk, but it wasn’t glass in someone’s eye either. It was the spoonful of sugar that helps the medicine go down. Now it’s the ‘Dream On‘ of our set.” The song was performed in drop D tuning. Drummer Matt Cameron called the song “a huge departure”. Credit is due to Michael Beinhorn and Brendan O’Brian, producer and recording engineer, respectively.

Regarding “Black Hole Sun”, Cornell stated, “It’s just sort of a surreal dreamscape, a weird, play-with-the-title kind of song.” He also said that “lyrically it’s probably the closest to me just playing with words for words’ sake, of anything I’ve written. I guess it worked for a lot of people who heard it, but I have no idea how you’d begin to take that one literally.” In another interview he elaborated further, stating, “It’s funny because hits are usually sort of congruent, sort of an identifiable lyric idea, and that song pretty much had none. The chorus lyric is kind of beautiful and easy to remember. Other than that, I sure didn’t have an understanding of it after I wrote it. I was just sucked in by the music and I was painting a picture with the lyrics. There was no real idea to get across.” Commenting upon how the song was misinterpreted as being positive, Cornell said, “No one seems to get this, but ‘Black Hole Sun’ is sad. But because the melody is really pretty, everyone thinks it’s almost chipper, which is ridiculous.” When asked about the line, “Times are gone for honest men”, Cornell said:

“It’s really difficult for a person to create their own life and their own freedom. It’s going to become more and more difficult, and it’s going to create more and more disillusioned people who become dishonest and angry and are willing to fuck the next guy to get what they want. There’s so much stepping on the backs of other people in our profession. We’ve been so lucky that we’ve never had to do that. Part of it was because of our own tenacity, and part of it was because we were lucky.”

Black Hole Sun – Chris Cornell

In my eyes, indisposed
In disguise as no one knows
Hides the face, lies the snake
in The sun in my disgrace
Boiling heat, summer stench
‘Neath the black the sky looks dead
Call my name through the cream
And I’ll hear you scream again

Black hole sun
Won’t you come
And wash away the rain
Black hole sun
Won’t you come
Won’t you come
Won’t you come

Stuttering, cold and damp
Steal the warm wind tired friend
Times are gone for honest men
And sometimes far too long for snakes
In my shoes, a walking sleep
And my youth I pray to keep
Heaven send Hell away
No one sings like you anymore

Black hole sun
Won’t you come
And wash away the rain
Black hole sun
Won’t you come
Won’t you come
Won’t you come

Black hole sun
Won’t you come
And wash away the rain
Black hole sun
Won’t you come
Won’t you come
Won’t you come

Hang my head, drown my fear
Till you all just disappear

Black hole sun
Won’t you come
And wash away the rain
Black hole sun
Won’t you come
Won’t you come
Won’t you come

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Spoonman ~ Soundgarden

Soundgarden Google images

Soundgarden is an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington, in 1984 by singer and rhythm guitarist Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. Matt Cameron became the band’s full-time drummer in 1986, while bassist Ben Shepherd became a permanent replacement for Yamamoto in 1990.

Soundgarden was one of the seminal bands in the creation of grunge, a style of alternative rock that developed in Seattle, and was one of a number of grunge bands signed to the record label Sub Pop. Soundgarden was the first grunge band to sign to a major label (A&M Records, in 1988), though the band did not achieve commercial success until they popularized the genre in the early 1990s with Seattle contemporaries Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Alice in Chains.

Soundgarden achieved its biggest success with the 1994 album Superunknown, which debuted at number one on the Billboard charts and yielded theGrammy Award-winning singles “Black Hole Sun” and “Spoonman”. In 1997, the band broke up due to internal strife over its creative direction. After several years working on projects and other bands, Soundgarden reunited in 2010 and their sixth studio album, King Animal, was released two years later.

Soundgarden’s origins can be found in a band called The Shemps, which performed around Seattle in the early 1980s, and featured bassist Hiro Yamamoto and drummer and singer Chris Cornell. Following Yamamoto’s departure, the band recruited guitarist Kim Thayil as its new bassist. Thayil had moved to Seattle from Park Forest, Illinois, with Yamamoto and Bruce Pavitt, who would later start the independent record label Sub Pop. Cornell and Yamamoto stayed in contact, and after The Shemps broke up Cornell and Yamamoto started jamming together, and were eventually joined by Thayil.

A Sound Garden
A Sound Garden

Soundgarden was formed in 1984 by Cornell (drums and vocals), Yamamoto (bass), and Thayil (guitar). The band named themselves after a wind-channeling pipe sculpture, “A Sound Garden”, located on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration property at 7600 Sand Point Way next to Magnuson Park, Seattle. Cornell originally played drums while singing, but in 1985 the band enlisted Scott Sundquist to allow Cornell to concentrate on vocals. The band traveled around playing various concerts with this line-up for about a year. Their first recordings were three songs that appeared on a 1986 compilation album for C/Z Records called Deep Six. It also featured songs by fellow grunge pioneers Green River, Skin Yard, Malfunkshun, The U-Men, and The Melvins. In 1986, Sundquist left the band to spend time with his family, and was replaced by Matt Cameron, the drummer from Skin Yard.

KCMU DJ Jonathan Poneman was impressed after seeing Soundgarden perform one night, later saying, “I saw this band that was everything rock music should be.” Poneman offered to fund a release by the band, so Thayil told him to team up with Bruce Pavitt. Poneman offered to contribute $20,000 in funding for Sub Pop, effectively turning it into a full-fledged record label.Soundgarden signed to Sub Pop, and the label released “Hunted Down” in 1987 as the band’s first single. The B-side of the “Hunted Down” single, “Nothing to Say”, appeared on the KCMU compilation tape Bands That Will Make Money, which was distributed to record companies, many of whom showed interest in Soundgarden. Through Sub Pop, the band released the Screaming Life EP in 1987, and the Fopp EP in 1988. A combination of the two was issued as Screaming Life/Fopp in 1990.

Spoonman

Spoonman” is a song by the American rock band Soundgarden. Written by frontman Chris Cornell, “Spoonman” was released on February 15, 1994 as the first single from the band’s fourth studio album, Superunknown (1994). “Spoonman” is often credited as one of the songs that launched Soundgarden’s career into the mainstream. The song peaked at number three on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart and number nine on the Modern Rock Tracks chart. A remixed version of the song by Steve Fisk appears on the “Black Hole Sun” and “My Wave” singles. The song was included on Soundgarden’s 1997 greatest hits album, A-Sides and the 2010 compilation album Telephantasm.

“Spoonman” was originally written for the soundtrack to the 1992 film, Singles. At this time, Soundgarden, along with fellow alternative rock band Pearl Jam, was working on the soundtrack for the film. Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament had been put in charge of creating the name for a fictional band that would appear in the film. Before finally choosing Citizen Dick for its name, Ament had compiled a list of potential names which included the name “Spoonman”. The name was inspired by Artis the Spoonman, a street performer from Santa Cruz,California and later Seattle, Washington, who plays music with a set of spoons. Soundgarden vocalist and songwriter Chris Cornell eventually used the names on the list to create songs for the film. ”Spoonman” was among these, and an acoustic version was created from it. This early version of the song can be heard in the background during a scene of the film.

Rather than just leave the song on the film’s soundtrack, Soundgarden began working on an electric version of “Spoonman”. The song’s inspiration, Artis the Spoonman, played a prominent role in the song itself. The final version of the song featured Artis the Spoonman playing his spoons as part of the song’s bridge. Drummer Matt Cameron also plays pots and pans on the song. Bassist Ben Shepherd performs backing vocals on the song.

Chris Cornell on “Spoonman”:

“It’s more about the paradox of who [Artis] is and what people perceive him as. He’s a street musician, but when he’s playing on the street, he is given a value and judged completely wrong by someone else. They think he’s a street person, or he’s doing this because he can’t hold down a regular job. They put him a few pegs down on the social ladder because of how they perceive someone who dresses differently. The lyrics express the sentiment that I much more easily identify with someone like Artis than I would watch him play.”

Spoonman – Chris Cornell

I feel the rhythm with your hands
[Steal the rhythm while you can]
Spoonman
Speak the rhythm on your own
[Speak the rhythm all alone]
Spoonman

Spoonman, come together with your hands
Save me, I’m together with your plan
Save me, save

All my friends are Indians
[All my friends are brown and red]
Spoonman
All my friends are skeletons
[They beat the rhythm with their bones]
Spoonman

Spoonman, come together with your hands
Save me, I’m together with your plan
Save me, save, save me, save me, save with your

Come on
Come on
Come on

Come on, will I get on?
Come on, will I get on?
Come on, will I get on?

Spoonman, come together with your hands
Save me, I’m together with your plan
Save me, save, save me with your, with your hand

Feel the rhythm with your hands
[Steal the rhythm while you can]
Spoonman

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Blue on Black ~ Kenny Wayne Shepherd

alanKenny Wayne Shepherd is an American guitaristsinger, and songwriter. He has released several studio albums and experienced significant commercial success both as a blues artist and a young musician.

Shepherd was born in Shreveport, Louisiana. He graduated Caddo Magnet High School in Shreveport. The guitarist is “completely self taught”, and does not read music. Growing up, Shepherd’s father (Ken Shepherd) was a local radio personality and some-time concert promoter, and had a vast collection of music. Shepherd got his first “guitar” at the age of three or four, when his grandmother purchased a series of several plastic guitars for him with S&H Green Stamps, which Shepherd has said he would “go through like candy”.

Shepherd stated in a 2010 interview that he began playing guitar in earnest at age seven, about six months after meeting and being “pretty mesmerized” by Stevie Ray Vaughan, in June 1984, at one of his father’s promoted concerts. His self-taught method employed a process of learning one note at a time, playing and rewinding cassette tapes, using “a cheap Yamaha wanna-be Stratocaster…made out of plywood, basically”, and learning to play by following along with material from his father’s record collection.

At the age of 13, Shepherd was invited to play guitar onstage by blues musician Bryan Lee. He subsequently made demo tapes, and a video was shot at Shepherd’s first performance at the Red River Revel Arts Festival in Shreveport. It was this video performance that impressed Giant Records chief Irving Azoff enough to sign Shepherd to a multiple album record deal.

From 1995 on, Shepherd took seven singles into the Top 10, and holds the record for the longest-running album on the Billboard Blues Charts with Trouble Is…. In 1996, Shepherd began a longtime collaboration with vocalist Noah Hunt, who provided the vocals for Shepherd’s signature song, “Blue on Black”. Shepherd has been nominated for five Grammy Awards, and has received two Billboard Music Awards, two Blues Music Awards and two Orville H. Gibson Awards.

In September 2008, Fender Musical Instruments Corp. released the Kenny Wayne Shepherd Signature Series Stratocaster, designed exclusively by Shepherd. In 2007, he released a critically acclaimed and two time Grammy nominated DVD-CD project, 10 Days Out: Blues from the Backroads. This documents Shepherd as he travels the country to jam with and interview the last of the authentic blues musicians. As they tour the backroads, Shepherd, with members of the Double Trouble Band, play with a host of blues greats including Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown and Bryan Lee, Buddy Flett (with whom he jams at Lead Belly’s grave), B. B. King, blues harp master Jerry “Boogie” McCain, Cootie Stark, Neal Pattman, John Dee Holeman, Etta Baker, Henry Townsend with Honeyboy Edwards, and a concert session with the surviving members of Muddy Waters’ and Howlin’ Wolf’s bands, including luminaries such as Hubert Sumlin, Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and Pinetop Perkins. In 2010 Shepherd was nominated for a Grammy for Live In Chicago which featured performances with Hubert Sumlin, Willie “Big Eyes” Smith, Buddy Flett and Bryan Lee. In 2011, Shepherd released his seventh CD entitled How I Go on Roadrunner Records.

Blue on Black

Blue on Black” is a song by American blues band Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band and is the lead single from their second studio albumTrouble Is…. Noah Hunt, a Cincinnati, Ohio native and Shepherd collaborator, is the lead singer. Released on April 7, 1997, the track rose to No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart and remained there for 6 non-consecutive weeks. “Blue on Black” was regarded as the best rock song of 1998 by various media, and its popularity helped make Trouble Is… the 1999 Blues Album of the Year in Billboard. The song continues to be a top download of the Kenny Wayne Shepherd catalog, ranking at No. 1 on Rhapsody.

“Blue on Black” features a simple acoustic guitar chord progression and ghostly lyrics with a faint echo. Its chorus incorporates a vocal harmonyand simple yet bold lyrical hook. An electric guitar solo aids the song’s rock edge. The subject matter deals with heartbreak and regret, as the narrator has just been through a tough break up. He laments that the loved one is gone but decides he cannot change the past. The lyrics incorporate comparative phrasing such as”Joker on jack/match on a fire/cold on ice/a dead man’s touch.” to emphasize inadequacy and regret.

Shepherd discussed the song’s commercial significance in an interview:

“The success at rock radio that we had early in my career, with ‘Blue on Black,’ I think we set a record. When that song was out, it definitely helped expose my music to a wider audience, and also, by gaining that exposure, then I get to turn a lot of those people on to the blues who may not have listened to the blues otherwise.”

As Shepherd’s signature song, “Blue on Black” has been known to help close his concerts just prior to “Voodoo Child.” An exclusive cover of the latter song was also included on the “Blue on Black” CD single.

The song has been included on compilation albums such as Loaded with Hits (2000), Double Shot of Blues (2001), and Powered by Fender: The Players (2003). A live version was included on WCCC Live at Planet of Sound in 2005.

Blue On Black – Shepherd, Selby, Sillers

Night, falls, and I’m alone
Skin, yeah, chilled me to the bone
You, turned and you ran,
Oh yeah
Oh slipped, right from my hand

Hey
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
A dead man’s touch
Whisper on a scream
Doesn’t change a thing
Don’t bring you back
Blue on black
Oh yeah, blue on black

Blind, oh, now I see
Truth, lies, and in between
Wrong, cant be undone
Oh slipped, from the tip of
Your tongue

Hey
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
A dead mans touch
Whisper on a scream
Doesn’t change a thing
Doesn’t bring you back, yeah
Blue on black
Oh, blue on black
Oh, yeah

Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
Is a dead man’s touch
Whisper on a scream
Doesn’t change a thing
Don’t bring you back
Blue on black
Oh yeah, blue on black

Hey
Blue on black
Tears on a river
Push on a shove
It don’t mean much
Joker on jack
Match on a fire
Cold on ice
Is a dead mans touch
Whisper on a scream
Doesn’t change a thing
Doesn’t bring you back
Blue on black
Oh, blue on black
Oh wha oh, blue on black
Oh, blue on black

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It’s Been Awhile ~ Staind

staindStaind formed on November 24, 1995 in Springfield, Massachusetts. After meeting through friends and covering KoRn, Rage Against the Machine, Pearl Jam, and Alice in Chains, among others, in smalltime clubs for a year and a half, Staind self-released their debut album, Tormented, in November 1996, citing influences Pantera and Sepultura. Until recently, the album was difficult to obtain, as only four thousand copies were originally sold. Since then, the band’s official website has released the album to meet the demand from fans.

During this time, Staind played a show with Limp Bizkit. When Fred Durst saw the controversial cover of the group’s debut album, he tried to have the band kicked off the bill, but when he saw the band’s live show, he changed his tone and befriended them, later singing backup on Aaron Lewis’s live, original version of the future Staind song “Outside.” Durst was one of the executive producers for Dysfunction and Break the Cycle. He also directed a few videos for the band later on.

It’s Been Awhile

The song is about singer Aaron Lewis’s life and about how it’s been a while since he’s done a lot of things. He makes references to his previous drug addiction problem and failed relationships with several women. He mentions his father however he believes he only has himself to be blamed for his problems.

It’s Been Awhile - Aaron Lewis

And it’s been awhile
Since I could hold my head up high
And it’s been awhile since I first saw you
And it’s been awhile since I could stand on my own two feet again
And it’s been awhile since I could call you

And everything I can’t remember
As fucked up as it all may seem
The consequences that I’ve rendered
I’ve stretched myself beyond my means

It’s been awhile
Since I can say that I wasn’t addicted
And it’s been awhile since I can say I love myself as well and
And it’s been awhile since I’ve gone and fucked things up just like I always do
And it’s been awhile but all that shit seems to disappear when I’m with you

And everything I can’t remember
As fucked up as it all may seem
The consequences that I’ve rendered
I’ve gone and fucked things up again

Why must I feel this way?
Just make this go away
Just one more peaceful day

And it’s been awhile
Since I could look at myself straight
And it’s been awhile since I said I’m sorry
And it’s been awhile since I’ve seen the way the candles light your face
And it’s been awhile but I can still remember just the way you taste

And everything I can’t remember
As fucked up as it all may seem to be
I know it’s me
I cannot blame this on my father
He did the best he could for me

And it’s been awhile
Since I could hold my head up high
And it’s ben awhile since I said I’m sorry

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I Melt With You ~ Modern English

modern-english

Formed in Colchester, Essex, England, in 1979 by Robbie Grey (vocals), Gary McDowell (guitar, vocals), and Michael Conroy (bass, vocals), Modern English were originally known as The Lepers. The group expanded to “Modern English” when Richard Brown (drums) and Stephen Walker (keyboards)  were subsequently added to the lineup of the band.

After a single on their own ‘Limp’ label in 1979, the band signed to 4AD the following year, with two further singles released, and a session for John Peel recorded before the band’s debut album, Mesh & Lace, in 1981, the band in the early days showing a strong Joy Divisioninfluence. (Mesh and lace is a style of Lingerie.) A second Peel session was recorded in October 1981. The follow-up, After The Snow (April 1982), was more keyboard-oriented and was compared to Simple Minds and Duran Duran. It was also released in the United States by Sire Records the following year, where it reached number 70 on the Billboard chart, and sold over 500,000 copies. Grey said of the album, “We used to think ‘God, we’ll never make a pop record. We’re artists!’, but things don’t always turn out as you planned and when you actually create a pop record, it’s so much more of a thrill than anything else”. The second single from the album was also a hit in the US, the jangly “I Melt With You” reaching number 76. When he reviewed the album, Johnny Waller of Sounds described the track as “A dreamy, creamy celebration of love and lust, which deserves to be showcased on as 12″ single all by itself, with no b-side”, while his colleague Tony Mitchell described it as “suburban amateurism at its most unrewarding”. The band relocated to New York City and worked on a third album, Ricochet Days, which again made the top 100 in the US, after which the band left 4AD and were solely signed to Sire outside the UK and Canada. The album Stop Start (1986) was the last record Modern English record released by Sire, with the band splitting up after its release. During 1983-84 time Grey, McDowell and Conroy were also involved with This Mortal Coil.

Robbie Grey reformed Modern English in 1989 with Mick Conroy and Aaron Davidson to record new album, Pillow Lips, released in 1990 on the American TVT label. The album featured a re-recorded “I Melt With You”, which was released as a single, and saw the band again in the Billboard top 100. The band split up for a second time in 1991, after contractual problems with TVT, with Grey forming Engine. In 1995, with the legal issues with TVT sorted out, Engine evolved into the next incarnation of Modern English and signed to the Imago label, with Grey and Matthew Shipley (keyboards). This lineup recorded the 1996 album Everything’s Mad.

Robbie Grey toured the US with a new Modern English lineup from 1998-2002 and travelled coast to coast across the US and recorded a new album with Hugh Jones (producer of earlier Modern English records). The songs written with guitarist Steven Walker (not to be confused with the band’s original keyboardist) and including Matthew Shipley came together on the road and back home in London between tours. After a few years on the shelf this collection of songs, entitled Soundtrack, was released on May 24, 2010 on Darla.

Also in 2010, the original lineup of the band reformed (minus drummer Richard Brown) and toured the US in July and September 2010 and the UK and Paris June 2011. They were invited by film director Mark Pellington to re-record “I Melt With You” for his movie of the same name. This same incarnation of the band remains intact and includes original members Robbie Grey, Mick Conroy, Gary McDowell, and Stephen Walker, augmented by (the “other”) Steven Walker on guitar and Ric Chandler on drums.

 

I Melt With You

I Melt with You” is a song by the British post-punk/new wave band Modern English. The song, produced by Hugh Jones, was a single from the 1982 album After the Snow, and is about a couple making love as nuclear bombs fall. It reached #7 on Billboard’s Top Tracks chart and #76 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1983. The song gained popularity due to its airplay on MTV in early 1983 and its use in the ending titles and in a “falling in love” montage sequence in Valley Girl the same year. The band re-recorded it in 1990 for their album Pillow Lips, the re-released version peaking at #76 on the Billboard Hot 100. The reformed original line up of the band re-recorded it again in 2010 in a completely reworked style for inclusion in the movie I Melt With You.

It is ranked #39 on VH1′s 100 greatest songs of the 80′s and #7 on VH1′s 100 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the 80s.

I Melt With You – Modern English

Moving forwards using all my breath
Making love to you was never second best
I saw the world crashing all around your face
Never really knowing it was always mesh and lace

I’ll stop the world and melt with you
You’ve seen the difference and it’s getting better all the time
There’s nothing you and I won’t do
I’ll stop the world and melt with you

(You should know better)
Dream of better lives the kind which never hates
(You should see why)
Trapped in a state of imaginary grace
(You should know better)
I made a pilgrimage to save this human’s race
(You should see why)
Never comprehending the race had long gone bye

(Let’s stop the world) I’ll stop the world and melt with you
(Let’s stop the world) You’ve seen the difference and it’s getting better all
the time
(Let’s stop the world) There’s nothing you and I won’t do
(Let’s stop the world) I’ll stop the world and melt with you

The future’s open wide

**The future’s open wide

(Let’s stop the world) I’ll stop the world and melt with you
(Let’s stop the world) I’ve seen some changes but it’s getting better all the
time
(Let’s stop the world) There’s nothing you and I won’t do
(Let’s stop the world) I’ll stop the world and melt with you

The future’s open wide

hmmm hmmm hmmm
hmmm hmmm hmmm hmmm
hmmm hmmm hmmm
hmmm hmmm hmmm hmmm

I’ll stop the world and melt with you (Let’s stop the world)
You’ve seen the difference and it’s getting better all the time (Let’s stop the
world)
There’s nothing you and I won’t do (Let’s stop the world)
I’ll stop the world and melt with you (Let’s stop the world)

I’ll stop the world and melt with you (Let’s stop the world)
I’ll stop the world and melt with you (Let’s stop the world)

I’ll stop the world and melt with you (Let’s stop the world)
I’ll stop the world and melt with you (Let’s stop the world)

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American Pie ~ Don McLean

Don McLean is an American singer-songwriter.

As a young teenager, McLean became interested in folk music, particularly the Weavers’ 1955 recording At Carnegie Hall. Childhood asthma meant that McLean missed long periods of school, and although he slipped back in his studies, his love of music was allowed to flourish. He often performed shows for family and friends. By age 16 he had bought his first guitar (a Harmony acoustic archtop with a sunburst finish) and begun making contacts in the music business, becoming friends with folk singer Erik Darling, a member of the Weavers. McLean recorded his first studio sessions (with singer Lisa Kindred) while still in prep school.

McLean graduated from Iona Preparatory School in 1963, and briefly attended Villanova University, dropping out after four months. While at Villanova he became friends with singer/songwriter Jim Croce.

After leaving Villanova, McLean became associated with famed folk music agent Harold Leventhal, and for the next six years performed at venues and events including the Bitter End and the Gaslight Cafe in New York, the Newport Folk Festival, the Cellar Door in Washington, D.C., and the Troubadour in Los Angeles. Concurrently, McLean attended night school at Iona College and received a Bachelors degree in Business Administration in 1968. He turned down a scholarship to Columbia University Graduate School in favour of becoming resident singer at Caffè Lena in Saratoga Springs, NY.

In 1968, with the help of a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts, McLean began reaching a wider public, with visits to towns up and down the Hudson River. He learned the art of performing from his friend and mentor Pete Seeger. McLean accompanied Seeger on his Clearwater boat trip up the Hudson River in 1969 to protest environmental pollution in the river. During this time McLean wrote songs that would appear on his first album, Tapestry. McLean co-edited the book Songs and Sketches of the First Clearwater Crew with sketches by Thomas B. Allen for which Pete Seeger wrote the foreword. Seeger and McLean sang “Shenandoah” on the 1974 Clearwater album.

In 1961 Don’s father died. Don had also been profoundly affected by the deaths of both Buddy Holly and John F. Kennedy. These events would influence him in later life.

American Pie

Don McLean’s most famous composition, “American Pie”, is often interpreted as describing the deaths of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper in an airplane crash on February 3, 1959, spawning the phrase, “The Day the Music Died.” McLean has stated that the lyrics are also somewhat autobiographical and present an abstract story of his life from the mid-1950s until the time he wrote the song in the late 1960s. The hometown legend is that “the levee” is his hometown bar, the Beechmont Tavern near Iona College. “American Pie” symbolizes the ongoing radical and tumultuous changes in popular music during this period, evolving from the often raw, upbeat sounds that marked the earliest days of rockabilly and the rock eras of the 1950s to the darker, more introspective, often cynical and increasingly socially conscious music of the late 1960s, driven by the sweeping social upheavals and volatile political atmosphere that had engulfed and defined America by the end of the decade.

Don McLean’s “American Pie” has remained the subject of intense scrutiny and philosophical interpretation for more than 30 years as music historians, scholars, professors of modern American literature, and his fans alike continue to search for its ‘deeper meaning.’ In interviews, Don claims to be amused that many interpretations start with the premise that he never talks about the song nor has ever provided insight into the meaning of the lyrics.   I have included a possible “key” to the lyrics below.

American Pie – Don McLean

A long, long time ago I can still remember how that music used to make me smile
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And maybe they’d be happy for a while.   1

But February made me shiver
With every paper I delivered,
Bad news on the door step,
I couldn’t take one more step,   2

I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride   3
But something touched me deep inside,
The day, the music, died.   4
So…

Bye, bye Miss American Pie   5
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry 6
Them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey ‘n’ rye   7
Singin this will be the day that I die.
This will be the day that I die. 8

Did you write the book of love 9
And do you have faith in God above,
If the bible tells you so.   10
And do you believe in rock ‘n’ roll?
Can music save your mortal soul? 11
And can you teach me how to dance real slow?

Well I know that you’re in love with him
Cuz I saw you dancin’ in the gym. 12
You both kicked off your shoes 13
And I dig those rhythm and blues. 14

I was a lonely teenage bronkin’ buck
With a pink carnation and a pick up truck 15
But I knew I was out of luck,
The day, the music, died.
I started singin…

Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey ‘n’ rye
Singin this will be the day that I die.
This will be the day that I die.

Now for ten years we’ve been on our own 16
And moss grows fat on a rollin stone 17
But that’s not how it used to be,
When the jester sang for the king and queen
In a coat he borrowed from James Dean 18
And a voice that came from you and me. 19

Oh and while the king was looking down,
The jester stole his thorny crown 20
The courtroom was adjourned;
No verdict was returned. 21

And while Lennon read a book on Marx, 22
The quartet practiced in the park 23
And we sang dirges in the dark, 24
The day, the music, died.
We were singin’…

Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey ‘n’ rye
Singin this will be the day that I die.
This will be the day that I die.

Helter Skelter in a summer swelter 25
The birds flew off with a fallout shelter,
Eight miles high and fallin’ fast. 26
It landed foul on the grass. 27
The players tried for a forward pass 28
With the jester on the sidelines in a cast. 29

Now the half-time air was sweet perfume 30
While the sergeants played a marching tune. 31
We all got up to dance
Oh but we never got the chance. 32

As the players tried to take the field
The marching band refused to yield.
Do you recall what was revealed, 33
the day, the music, died?
We started singin’…

Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey ‘n’ rye
Singin this will be the day that I die.
This will be the day that I die.

Oh and there we were all in one place, 34
A generation lost in space
With no time left to start again. 35
So come on, Jack be nimble, Jack be quick. 36
Jack Flash sat on a candle stick 37
Because fire is the devils only friend.38

Oh and as I watched him on the stage,
My hands were clinched in fists of rage,
No angel born in hell
Could break that Satan’s spell. 39

And as the flames climbed high into the night
To light the sacrificial rite
I saw Satan laughing with delight,40
The day, the music, died.
He was singin’…

Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey ‘n’ rye
Singin this will be the day that I die.
This will be the day that I die.

I met a girl who sang the blues 41
And I asked her for some happy news
But she just smiled and turned away. 42
I went down to the sacred store
Where I’d heard the music years before
But the man there said the music wouldn’t play. 43

And in the streets the children screamed, 44
The lovers cried, and the poets dreamed. 45
But not a word was spoken,
The church bells all were broken. 46

And the three men I admire most,
The Father, Son, and the Holy Ghost, 47
They caught the last train for the coast, 48
The day, the music, died.
And they were singin’…

They were singin’…

Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
Them good ol’ boys were drinkin’ whiskey ‘n’ rye
Singin’ this will be the day that I die.

The Key

1. The song is about the history of rock and roll music and how it changed after Buddy Holly’s death. It is also, however, about McLean’s growing up, and his love of the pure rock and roll of the ’50s. McClean was a musician. He wanted to make people dance. Most 50′s music was meant for dancing and in general upbeat and happy, in contrast to 60′s music.

2. McClean was a paperboy on February 3, 1959 when Buddy Holly’s plane crashed. He was devastated by the news, since Holly was his idol.

3. Holly’s recent bride was pregnant when the crash took place; she had a miscarriage shortly afterward.

4. The same plane crash that killed Buddy Holly also took the lives of Richie Valens (“La Bamba”) and The Big Bopper (“Chantilly Lace”). Since all three were so prominent at the time, February 3, 1959 became known as “The Day The Music Died.”

5. Goodbye to the music of America, the Rock ‘n’ Roll and dance music of the ’50s. It’s interesting how McLean has feminized 50′s rock music here, the fact that it’s a virgin (Miss) form of music that’s as American as apple pie.

6. Chevy represents America. The Levee is the bar where McLean and his friends hung out in his hometown of New Rochelle, NY. It closed down.

7. This line is a play on words. Rye is a city in New York near where McLean grew up. When the Levee closed, the “good ol’ boys,” McLean and his friends, fled to drink in Rye where together they mourned the deaths of the trio.

8. One of Holly’s hits was “That’ll be the Day”; the chorus contains the line, “That’ll be the Day that I Die.”

9. “The Book of Love” by the Monotones; hit in 1958.

10. In 1955, Don Cornell did a song entitled “The Bible Tells Me So.” This line could also refer to the sense of disparity that maybe God let us down after the assassination of John Kennedy and the general disillusionment of the early ’60s. It is also likely that these lines are meant to garnish rock ‘n’ roll with religious imagery, because most of the early musicians, including Holly, got their start in church choirs or by singing hymns. An old children’s hymn called “Jesus Loves Me” has the line “the Bible tells me so” in the lyrics.

11. This is a lament of the decline of the dance music of the ’50s. It might also be a reference to The Lovin’ Spoonful’s hit in 1965 with John Sebastian’s “Do you Believe in Magic?” Or, McLean might be questioning the integrity of music and it’s worth after the plane crash

12. Dancing slow was an important part of early rock and roll dance events — but declined in importance through the 60′s as things like psychedelia and the 10-minute guitar solo gained prominence. Back then, dancing was an expression of love, and carried a connotation of commitment. Dance partners were not so readily exchanged as they would be later. Allegorically, the “him” is probably all the young, hansom teen idols that were common in the late ’50s and early ’60s. The “you” represents all the teenage girls who swooned over those idols.

13. A reference to a “sock hop,” generally held in gymnasiums.

14. McLean is letting us know he prefers the R&B music of the ’50′s to the sock hop music.

15. “A White Sport Coat (And a Pink Carnation),” was a hit for Marty Robbins in 1957. McLean was lonely because his music was out of style.

16. It was roughly 10 years after the death of Buddy Holly that McLean started writing “American Pie.”

17. The “rolling stone” is a reference to Bob Dylan, since “Like a Rolling Stone” (1965) was his first major hit; he was busy writing songs extolling the virtues of simple love, family and contentment while staying at home and raking in the royalties. It also is a reference to The Rolling Stones, and a symbollic reversal of the aphorism, “A rolling stone gathers no moss.” To McLean, the music of the ’60s was gathering moss–growing stale. “That’s not how it used to be” refers to the early days of Dylan.

18. The jester is Bob Dylan. The king could refer to Elvis. The Queen is probably the Queen of England, whom Dylan performed for. In the movie “Rebel Without a Cause”, James Dean has a red windbreaker that holds symbolic meaning throughout the film. In one particularly intense scene, Dean lends his coat to a guy who is shot and killed; Dean’s father arrives, sees the coat on the dead man, thinks it’s Dean, and loses it. On the cover of “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan”, Dylan is wearing just such as red windbreaker, and is posed in a street scene similar to one shown in a well-known picture of James Dean. Bob Dylan played a command performance for the Queen and Prince Consort of England. He was not properly attired, so perhaps this is a reference to his apparel.

19. A reference to Dylan’s style of music, folk music, from the people (you and me).

20. This could be a reference to Elvis’s decline and Dylan’s ascendance. (i.e. Presley is looking down from a height as Dylan takes his place.) The thorny crown might be a reference to the price of fame, or another religious metaphor.

21. This could be the trial of the Chicago Seven. It could also refer to the aftermath of the Kennedy assassination, which really had no “verdict,” and is still open to speculation. Most likely, it is a reference to the fact that there really is no true “king” of rock ‘n’ roll during this period. For even though Dylan has grabbed (stolen) the mantle of rock’s spokesman, the verdict is still out.

22. This is a play on words. Literally, John Lennon reading about Karl Marx; figuratively, the introduction of radical politics into the music of the Beatles. Both Lennon and Lenin (Soviet dictator) believed in Marxist philosophy.

23. Allegorically, this line probably refers to the time when the Beatles were still playing in England and Europe. They were still “practicing” because they had not come to America yet.

24. A “dirge” is a funeral or mourning song, so perhaps this is meant literally, morning the death of Holly or his music…or, perhaps, this is a reference to some of the new “art rock” groups which played long pieces not meant for dancing. It’s likely just a reference to McLean’s unhappiness with the way music was going.

25. “Helter Skelter” is a Beatles song which appears on the “White Album.” Charles Manson, claiming to have been “inspired” by the song led his followers in the Tate-LaBianca murders. The “summer swelter” might be a reference to the “Summer of Love” or perhaps to the “long hot summer” of Watts.

26. The Byrd’s “Eight Miles High” was on their late 1966 release “Fifth Dimension”. It was one of the first records to be widely banned because of supposedly drug-oriented lyrics.

27. One of the Byrds was busted for possession of marijuana.

28. The football metaphor could be the Rolling Stones, i.e. they were waiting for an opening which really didn’t happen until the Beatles broke up. Or it could refer to attempts of other musicians to come into the limelight while Dylan was laid up.

29. On July 29, 1966, Dylan crashed his Triumph 55 motorcycle while riding near his home in Woodstock, New York. He spent nine months in seclusion while recuperating from the accident.

30. Drugs, or the hidden messages about drugs in some of the songs of the mid-’60s (half-time in the decade).

31. A clear reference to Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the Beatles 1967 album that changed rock ‘n’ roll forever. It was the first theme album, the first to put lyrics on the cover, the first to use synthetic sounds. It had no hit singles, another new concerpt in album production. It had proported hidden messages, mostly drug messages in songs like “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds (LSD). McLean liked it (sweet perfume).

32. All the youth got into this album. They didn’t get the chance to dance because the Beatles had now pushed rock music away from its dance roots. They used orchestras. They wrote long, slow songs with ponderous rhythms. Or it could also refer to the fact that the Beatles’ 1966 Candlestick Park concert lasted only 35 minutes.

33. No one could compete against the Beatles. Some folks think this refers to either the 1968 Demomcratic Convention or Kent State. What was “revealed” was the dark underlying messages of rock music: the Marxism that was alluded to in the previous verse, the advocation of drug use, the overly self-obsessed quality of the lyrics.

34. The “place” was Woodstock.

35. Perhaps this is a reference to “hippies”, who were sometimes known as the “lost generation”, partially because of their particularly acute alienation from their parents, and partially because of their presumed preoccupation with drugs. It could also be a reference to the ’60s TV show, “Lost in Space,” whose title was sometimes used as a synonym for someone who was rather high. Perhaps, their preference for psychedelia had pushed rock and roll so far from Holly’s music that it couldn’t be retrieved.

36. Probably a reference to Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones; “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” was released in May, 1968.

37. The Stones’ Candlestick park concert? Candlestick park was also the venue for the Beatles’ final performance–the end of the rock ‘n’ roll era.

38. It’s possible that this is a reference to the Grateful Dead’s “Friend of the Devil”.

39. While playing a concert at the Altamont Speedway in 1968, the Stones appointed members of the Hell’s Angels to work security (on the advice of the Grateful Dead). In the darkness near the front of the stage, a young man named Meredith Hunter was beaten and stabbed to death — by the Angels. Public outcry that the song “Sympathy for the Devil” had somehow incited the violence caused the Stones to drop the song from their show for the next six years. This incident is chronicled in the documentary film “Gimme Shelter”. It’s also possible that McLean views the Stones as being negatively inspired (remember, he had an extensive religious background) by virtue of “Sympathy for the Devil”, “Their Satanic Majesties’ Request” and so on.

40. This could be a reference to Jimi Hendrix burning his Stratocaster at the Monterey Pop Festival, or simply the bonfires that were lit at the outside concerts. It could be a reference to Jagger dancing and prancing while the murder was happening. Mick Jagger is Satan, the murder provided the sacrifice.

41. Janis Joplin

42. Janis died of an accidental heroin overdose on October 4, 1970.

43. The “sacred store” might be Bill Graham’s Fillmore East, one of the great rock and roll venues of all time. Alternatively, this refers to record stores, and their longtime (then discontinued) practice of allowing customers to preview records in the store. It could also refer to record stores as “sacred” because this is where one goes to get “saved”. (See above lyric “Can music save your mortal soul?”) The music “wouldn’t play” means that nobody is interested in hearing Buddy Holly et.al.’s music anymore. Or, as above, the discontinuation of the in-store listening booths. Another interpretion is that the “store” is the record industry in 1970; the “music” is McLean’s own song, American Pie, and “the man” is the recording industry and radio. McLean’s style of music, particularly this song, just wouldn’t play. It was too long (over 8 minutes), too folksy, and too late.

44. Protesters being beaten by police and National Guard troops.

45. The trend towards psychedelic music in the ’60s.

46. It could be that the broken bells are the dead musicians: neither can produce any more music.

47. Holly, The Big Bopper, and Valens.

48. They died; rock died. Elvis has left the building. Buddy Holly is no more. Rock ‘n’ roll is over, at least in its original form. And Don McLean can only watch them go and sing, “Bye-bye, Miss American Pie…”

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