Daisy Jane ~ America

America are an English-American folk rock band, originally composed of members Gerry Beckley, Dewey Bunnell, and Dan Peek. The three members were barely past their teenage years when they became an overnight musical sensation in 1972. They reached a peak in popularity in the early to mid 1970s and early 1980s. Among the band’s best known songs are “A Horse with No Name,” “Sister Golden Hair” (both of which reached Number 1), “Ventura Highway,” and “Tin Man”.

Sons of American fathers and British mothers, their fathers being military personnel stationed at the United States Air Force installation at RAF West Ruislip, London, all three attended London Central High School, at High Wycombe in the mid-1960s where they met while playing in two different bands.

Peek left for the United States for an abortive attempt at college in 1969. Upon his return to the UK the following year, the three hooked up and began to collaborate on making music. Starting out with borrowed acoustic guitars, they developed a sound which incorporated three-part vocal harmony in the vein of contemporary folk-rock acts like Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

Eventually the trio dubbed themselves America, honoring the name of the homeland they had hardly ever seen during their many travels around the world.

Daisy Jane

Daisy Jane” is a song written by Gerry Beckley of the group America which was introduced on the 1975 America album Hearts. Issued as that album’s second single – following up the #1 hit “Sister Golden Hair”, “Daisy Jane” reached #20 on the Billboard Hot 100 becoming the final Top 20 hit by the original three-member incarnation of America: on the Easy Listening chart the track reached #4.

The song’s narrator indicates he’s flying back to Memphis in hopes of reconnecting with the girl he left behind “to roam the city”. Beckley, who wrote the song at his cottage in East Sussex, has stated: “There was no such person as Daisy Jane and I had never even been to Memphis”; he believes that the Nick Drake song “Hazey Jane” likely gave him [i.e. Beckley] the idea of writing a song entitled “Daisy Jane”.

The piano motif was covered in the opening bars of Janet Jackson’s 1987 ballad Let’s Wait Awhile.

A cello is heard during the instrumental portion plus the second verse and Chorus.


Daisy Jane - Gerry Beckley

Flyin’ me back to Memphis
Gotta find my Daisy Jane
Well, the summer’s gone
And I hope she’s feelin’ the same

Well, I left her just to roam the city
Thinkin’ it would ease the pain
I’m a crazy man
And I’m playin’ my crazy game, game

Does she really love me
I think she does
Like the stars above me
I know because
When the sky is bright
Everything’s alright

Flyin’ me back to Memphis
Honey, keep the oven warm
All the clouds are clearin’
And I think we’re over the storm

Well, I’ve been pickin’ it up around me
Daisy, I think I’m sane
And I’m awful glad
And I guess you’re really to blame, blame

Do you really love me
I hope you do
Like the stars above me
How I love you
When it’s cold at night
Everything’s alright

Does she really love me
I think she does
Like the stars above me
I know because
When the sky is bright
Everything’s alright

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Generation Landslide ~ Alice Cooper

Alice Cooper is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans five decades. With a stage show that features guillotines, electric chairs, fake blood and boa constrictors, Cooper drew equally from horror movies, vaudeville, heavy metal and garage rock to create a theatrical brand of rock music that would come to be known as shock rock.

Alice Cooper was originally a band consisting of Furnier on vocals and harmonica, lead guitarist Glen Buxton, Michael Bruce on rhythm guitar, Dennis Dunaway on bass guitar, and drummer Neal Smith. The original Alice Cooper band broke into the international music mainstream with 1971’s monster hit “I’m Eighteen” from the album Love it to Death, which was followed by the even bigger single “School’s Out” in 1972. The band reached their commercial peak with the 1973 album Billion Dollar Babies.

Generation Landslide

The year was 1972. Alice Cooper came out with his “Billion Dollar Babies” album, and just about everyone had the 8-Track in their car. Generation landslide was a cut off of that album.

Generation Landslide – Cooper, Buxton, Bruce, Dunaway, Smith

Please clean your plate, dear.
The Lord above can see ya.
Don’t you know people are starving in Korea?
Alcohol and razor blades and poison and needles,
Kindergarten people – they use ‘em, the need ‘em.
The over indulgent machines were their children.
There wasn’t a way down on Earth here to cool ‘em,
‘Cause they look just like humans at Kresges and Woolworths.
But decadent brains were at work to destroy.
Brats in battalions were ruling the streets,
Sayin’ generation landslide closed the gap between ‘em.

And I laugh to myself at the men and the ladies
Who never conceived of us billion dollar babies.

Militant mothers hiding in their basement
Using pots and pans as their shields and their helmets.
Molotov milk bottles heaved from pink high chairs,
While Mothers’ Lib burns birth certificate papers.
Dad gets his allowance from his sonny, the dealer,
Who’s pubic to the world but involved in high finance.
Sister’s out ’til five doing banker’s son’s hours.
But she owns a Maserati that’s a gift from his father.
Stopped at full speed at one hundred miles per hour.
The Colgate invisible shield finally got ‘em.

And I laugh to myself at the men and the ladies
Who never conceived of us billion dollar babies.

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Billion Dollar Babies ~ Alice Cooper

Alice Cooper is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans five decades. With a stage show that features guillotines, electric chairs, fake blood and boa constrictors, Cooper drew equally from horror movies, vaudeville, heavy metal and garage rock to create a theatrical brand of rock music that would come to be known as shock rock.

Alice Cooper was originally a band consisting of Furnier on vocals and harmonica, lead guitarist Glen Buxton, Michael Bruce on rhythm guitar, Dennis Dunaway on bass guitar, and drummer Neal Smith. The original Alice Cooper band broke into the international music mainstream with 1971’s monster hit “I’m Eighteen” from the album Love it to Death, which was followed by the even bigger single “School’s Out” in 1972. The band reached their commercial peak with the 1973 album Billion Dollar Babies.

Billion Dollar Babies

Billion Dollar Babies is a popular 1973 single by rock group Alice Cooper, taken from the album “Billion Dollar Babies”. It was released in July 1973, months after the album had been released. The track is a duet between Alice Cooper and Donovan, who provides the falsetto vocals.

BMI lists  the composers of “Billion Dollar Babies” as Alice Cooper, Michael Bruce and Reggie Vinson (a session guitarist who had worked with the Alice Cooper band previously). Some sources list the composers as Cooper, Bruce, drummer Neal Smith, and “R. Reggie” . The chorus has the same melody as The Hollies’s 1966 song “Tell Me to My Face.”

Billion Dollar Babies also became the name of a band which descended from the Alice Cooper band that recorded the song. The Billion Dollar Babies album was one of the last recorded by the Alice Cooper band, before singer Alice Cooper went solo. Legal complications ensued; all five Alice Cooper band members had shared ownership of the band’s name. The original band never again recorded under the name Alice Cooper, but former Alice Cooper Band members Michael Bruce, Dennis Dunaway, and Neal Smith, along with additions Bob Dolin and Mike Marconi, recorded as Billion Dollar Babies.  The band Billion Dollar Babies only released one album, 1977’s ‘Battleaxe’, before disbanding.

Billion Dollar Babies – Cooper, Bruce, Smith, Vinson

Billion dollar baby
Rubber little lady, slicker than a weasel,
Grimy as an alley
Loves me like no other lover.

Billion dollar baby
Rotten little monster, baby, I adore you.
Man or woman living couldn’t love me like you, baby.

We go dancing nightly in the attic
While the moon is rising in the sky.
If I’m too rough, tell me,
I’m so scared your little head will come off in my hands.

Yeah, billion dollar baby
I got you in the dimestore,
No other little girl could ever hold you
Any tighter, any tighter than me, baby.
Billion dollar baby
Reckless like a gambler, million dollar maybe
Foamin’ like dog that’s been infected by the rabies.

We go dancing nightly in the attic
While the moon is rising in the sky.
If I’m too rough, tell me,
I’m so scared your little head will come off in my hands.

Million dollar baby,
Billion dollar baby,
Trillion dollar baby,
Zillion dollar baby.

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The Ballad of Thunder Road ~ Robert Mitchum

Robert Mitchum was an Academy Award nominated American film actor, author, composer and singer. Mitchum is largely remembered for his starring roles in several major works of the film noir style, and is considered a forerunner of the anti-heroesprevalent in film during the 1950s and 1960s.

One of the lesser known aspects of Mitchum’s career was his forays into music, both as singer and composer. Mitchum’s voice was often used instead of that of a professional singer when his characters sang in his films. Notable productions featuring Mitchum’s own singing voice included Rachel and the Stranger, River of No Return and The Night of the Hunter. After hearing traditional calypso music and meeting artists such as Mighty Sparrow and Lord Invader while filming Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison in the Caribbean island of Tobago, he recorded Calypso – Is Like So… in March of 1957. A year later he recorded a song he had written for the film Thunder Road, titled “The Ballad of Thunder Road.” The country-styled song became a modest hit for Mitchum, reaching #69 on the Billboard Pop Singles Chart.

The Ballad of Thunder Road

The Ballad of Thunder Road is a song written by actor Robert Mitchum in 1957. It was the theme song of the movie Thunder Road.

It tells the tale of “Lucas Doolin” (Robert Mitchum), a bootlegger during the 1950s who would deliver moonshine along local roads at excessive speeds to avoid “revenuers”.

Lucas’ father asks him for his next run to “make this run your last”, and that he should not attempt to outrun the revenuers, but if he could not get through safely, to turn himself in. However, Lucas ignores his father’s request, and attempts to outrun the law, but fails to evade them and dies as a result (the last lines read: Then right outside of Bearden, they made the fatal strike./He left the road at 90, that’s all there is to say/The Devil got the moonshine and the mountain boy that day).

Mitchum got the tune for the song from an old folk-dance song his mother used to sing to him. He also played the bootlegger in the movie.

The song is subtly referenced in Steve Earle’s song Copperhead Road, another song about moonshine running (it is implied that the bootlegger left behind a wife and son, the son would later abandon the moonshine business for marijuana).

The Ballad of Thunder Road – Mitchum, Marshall

Let me tell the story, I can tell it all
About the mountain boy who ran illegal alcohol
His daddy made the whiskey, son, he drove the load
When his engine roared, they called the highway Thunder Road.

Sometimes into Ashville, sometimes Memphis town
The revenoors chased him but they couldn’t run him down
Each time they thought they had him, his engine would explode
He’d go by like they were standin’ still on Thunder Road.

And there was thunder, thunder over Thunder Road
Thunder was his engine, and white lightning was his load
There was moonshine, moonshine to quench the Devil’s thirst
The law they swore they’d get him, but the Devil got him first.

On the first of April, nineteen fifty-four
A Federal man sent word he’d better make his run no more
He said two hundred agents were coverin’ the state
Whichever road he tried to take, they’d get him sure as fate.

Son, his Daddy told him, make this run your last
The tank is filled with hundred-proof, you’re all tuned up and gassed
Now, don’t take any chances, if you can’t get through
I’d rather have you back again than all that mountain dew.

And there was thunder, thunder over Thunder Road
Thunder was his engine, and white lightning was his load
There was moonshine, moonshine to quench the Devil’s thirst
The law they swore they’d get him, but the Devil got him first.

Roarin’ out of Harlan, revvin’ up his mill
He shot the gap at Cumberland, and screamed by Maynordsville
With T-men on his taillights, roadblocks up ahead
The mountain boy took roads that even Angels feared to tred.

Blazing right through Knoxville, out on Kingston Pike,
Then right outside of Bearden, they made the fatal strike.
He left the road at 90; that’s all there is to say.
The devil got the moonshine and the mountain boy that day.

UPDATE:

In the comments below, Bob Ellis points out that the soundtrack of the movie is NOT sung by Robert Mitchum.  He asked if anyone knew who actually sung the song in the opening credits of the movie and throughout the movie.

This wasn’t the first time someone has asked me this, and I thought I would set out to find out.

I “Googled”, I “Yahoo’d”, I even “Binged”.  All I could find were a lot of people asking, and only a few people speculating.  The general consensus of those doing the speculating was that it might have been either Randy Sparks or Jimmie F. Rodgers.

So I thought I would simply ask Randy Sparks himself.  I emailed him yesterday, and by this morning he answered back with not only the answer, but a very interesting and detailed back story.  I asked him if I could post his email in full here so that he could tell the story in his own words.

Thanks much for the kind words, DJ. It’s nice to be appreciated, even as an old man…especially as an old man.

Yes, I sang the title song in Thunder Road. It’s somewhat embarrassing to me now that I can sing much better, but that’s not the whole story. The song had been orchestrated in the wrong key, about three full-steps too high, and the orchestrator refused to change what he had written. I had already lost my billing in the picture, and I was absolutely powerless to get the problem fixed.

I had been contracted to write the title song and sing it. Robert Mitchum had seen me on the Bob Crosby Show in my Navy uniform, and he told the people around him, “That’s the guy I want to play the role of my kid brother in the movie.” His director called my manager, and the deal was struck. I was to act in the flick and write and sing the song. I was still in the Navy when all of this took place, but everyone was pleased that I had such a wonderful opportunity, and I was certain that I’d be granted time-off to join the film crew in Asheville, North Carolina. They sent me a script, and I immediately began memorizing my lines and working on the music. I wrote two themes: Whippoorwill and Thunder Road, and I was feeling pretty good about the assignment. Just then, something miraculous happened that made my life a lot easier. The Navy, it seems, got tired of dealing with draftees. I had been in the front row of the hapless crowd at the Induction Center in San Francisco when the man in charge said, “First two rows Navy, second two rows Army!” That apparently had never happened before. The Navy usually didn’t have to draft anybody, but I was drafted exactly four years after the beginning of the Korean Conflict, and back then the boys had flocked to the Navy in order to stay out of the Army and Marine Corps. Now the Navy was becoming shorthanded, so they’d decided to draft a few people. I had just the previous year come from San Diego where I’d done three years of my college time (San Diego JC and SD State), and like everyone else in a seaport town, I hated sailors; now I was one! Exactly eighteen months after I had been standing in that front row, the Navy decided to boot-out the draftees three-months early, and I was mustered out (with a good conduct discharge) from Washington, DC. I caught a flight that morning to Asheville.

I had a legal contract for more money than I deserved, but there were two major disappointments that I received upon my arrival on location. Bob had yet to hear my two songs for the picture, but he informed me that he and Don Raye had gotten together to write the theme song, and I would be singing their song, not mine. He also let me know that his 16-year-old song Jimmy had lobbied him to play the part of his kid brother, and he had agreed to that arrangement. I would no longer be acting in the film, but I would still be there for the duration, and I’d appear in a cameo role. He was very apologetic about my loss of the acting assignment, but I certainly understood the problem. I handed over the demo records I had made of my two songs. He told me he liked the songs, but that the changes had already been made. He then asked me who was playing guitar on my dubs, and I told him about Ralph Grasso, my pal who was also a Navy Talent Contest winner from The Ed Sullivan Show. Bob said, “Let’s get him down here.” There was a problem with that. “Ralph is still in the Navy,” I told him,” and I don’t know that he could get time-off to be here.” “I’ll call the Secretary of The Navy, if I have to,” Mitchum replied, “He’s a friend of mine.” I called Ralph, and he was there in Asheville the next day. “Were you able to get leave?” I asked. “No,” he said sheepishly, “I’m AWOL!” This news made me feel terrible.

On my second day in Asheville, I was standing around in the lobby of the Battery Park Hotel when I noticed a nice-looking young woman, about my age, and she didn’t look happy. I asked her if there was something wrong, and she said, “I think I was brought here for the wrong reason. I’m not that kind of girl.” I had become aware of the meat-market atmosphere, and the whole cast and crew seemed to be sexually hyperactive, but her problem was with Bob. “He insists that I join him in his room for dinner and a private script reading,” she said, “and I’m not comfortable with that arrangement.” “How would you like to have dinner with me?” I asked. “That’s the best offer I’ve had all day,” she quipped. We were in the hotel dining room when RM entered, saw the empty plates, and became quietly enraged. He didn’t look at me; he spoke only to her. “I thought we were supposed to have dinner together,” he snarled. “I had a better offer,” she replied. Nothing more was said, and she and I spent much of the next month together. She was a genuinely nice girl, and I served honorably as her protector. We had a wonderful vacation at the company’s expense, but that’s how I lost my billing in the film. Her name was Sandra Knight, and she later on married Jack Nicholson.

I’ve just now taken a few moments away from the keyboard to play the You-Tube opening credits of Thunder Road, and it doesn’t sound so bad to me, but my wife gets hysterical whenever it comes on TV. It’s so high…I sound more like Della Reese.

Jack Marshall, who wrote the music for the flick, was an excellent musician, and he could have fixed the problem in a few minutes, but he refused to do so, and the picture was already over budget. Jack played guitar on my subsequent first solo hit record, Walkin’ The Low Road.

Mitchum’s long-time stand-in Tim Wallace knew what had happened to my screen credits and why, and he invited me as his guest to a special cast party at the Beverly Hilton Hotel later on. My name had somehow been omitted on the official list.

I know this is much more than you wanted to know, but I need to add a couple of finishing touches. Ralph Grasso now lives in Tucson, and he joined us just the other day for our two concerts in Phoenix. We’d gotten together just before that at Saddle Brooke in Tucson. He played guitar with me in our sold-out concerts there, and it was like old home week. After the Navy (and he got away with being AWOL, by the way; he’d had friends cover for him), he came to California at my invitation, and built a career as one of the most successful studio musicians.

Just a couple of years after my Thunder Road adventure, Robert M showed up where I was appearing at Ye Little Club in Beverly Hills. He was a little bit drunk on Chivas Regal, but couldn’t have been nicer to me. Then the problem started. An ancient and famous old bandleader (whose name I cannot remember) came up to where Bob and I were visiting after my show, and said to me, “Congratulation, I take full credit for discovering you.” I had done some program with him and his band, but it wasn’t a major event, and there certainly had been no discovering. Mitchum instantly took offense, telling the guy that I was HIS discovery, and the two of them actually began scuffling. I had to separate them.

Sometimes, when I think about all the unbelievable moments in my life, I get really amused. That probably hasn’t ever happened to anybody else. Why me, Lord?

Cheers! RS

© Copyright 2009 Cherrybell Music, used by permission

So there you have it.

  • The following is the soundtrack version with Randy Sparks singing:

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Country Song ~ Seether

seetherSeether is a South-African rock and metal band from Johannesburg, formed in 1999.  Originally named Saron Gas, they changed their name in 2002.

Saron Gas was started in Johannesburg, South Africa, and the earliest days of the group saw their public appearances at parties, nightclubs, large-scale concerts, and university venues, such as the University of Cape Town and the University of Stellenbosch, where they played for the lunch-time crowds in the Neelsie centre on the latter campus as late as the summer of 2001.

As Saron Gas, the band released its first album, Fragile, on Musketeer Records, in 2000 in South Africa. Upon the band’s achieving success on the South African Singles Chart, Wind-up Records took an interest in Saron Gas’s melodic-yet-heavy sound and signed them to the label. The band changed their name to avoid confusion with the fatal sarin gas, a executing gas that was almost going to be used in World War II by the German Army Weapons Office. The band changed its name to Seether in honor of Veruca Salt’s song “Seether”

Country Song

Country Song” is a song by South African post-grunge/alternative metal band Seether. It was released on March 8, 2011 as the lead single from their fifth studio album Holding Onto Strings Better Left to Fray.

According to frontman Shaun Morgan, the track’s title “got its name from the swampy verse riff”. On the band’s official message board, Morgan explained the track’s background, saying “in some ways I guess I was dealing with growing up and having to make better life choices. It’s definitely not country, but we recorded the album in Nashville, and felt like it was a small homage to such a wonderful city.”


Country Song – Seether

Well I can’t stand to look at you now
This revelation’s out of my hands
Still I can’t bear the thought of you now
This complication’s leaving me scared

Stay when you think you want me
Pray when you need advice
Hey keep your sickness off me trying to get through
Blame all your weakness on me
Shame that I’m so contrite
Hey keep your fingers off me, why can’t I get through?

You think you have the best of intentions
I cannot shake the taste of blood in my mouth

(Hey) I keep on thinking that it’s
(Hey) all done and all over now (whoa)
You keep on thinking you can save me, save me
(Hey) My ship is sinking but it’s
(Hey) all good and I can go down (whoa)
You’ve got me thinking that the party’s all over

Well I can’t stand to be with myself
This liberation’s seemingly rare
And I can’t stand the taste of your mouth
This sublimation’s out of my hands

You stay ’cause you think you want me
Pray when you need advice
Hey keep your sickness off me (I’m trying to get through)
Shame you can’t take this from me
Bane on the empty mind
Hey keep your fingers off me, why can’t I get through?

(Hey) I keep on thinking that it’s
(Hey) all done and all over now (whoa)
You keep on thinking you can save me, save me
(Hey) My ship is sinking but it’s
(Hey) all good and I can go down (whoa)
You’ve got me thinking that the party’s all over

Lay down
Just stay down
Lay down because I am trying to get through

Say what you want but you’re not gonna win this time
Take what you want, but just leave me alive [x2]

(Hey) I keep on thinking that it’s
(Hey) all done and all over now (whoa)
You keep on thinking you can save me, save me
(Hey) My ship is sinking but it’s
(Hey) all good and I can go down (whoa)
Still you believe that we can start it all over

Lay down
Just stay down
Lay down because the party’s all over

Lay down
Just stay down
Lay down because I am trying to get through

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Kongos ~ Come With Me Now

kongosKongos (sometimes styled as KONGOS) is a South African alternative rock band consisting of four brothers: Johnny, Jesse, Dylan and Daniel Kongos. They spent their childhoods in the city of London and in South Africa. They compose, record and perform in Phoenix, Arizona. The four men are the sons of John Kongos. They are of Greek origin and have attended the Greek Saheti school in Gauteng, South Africa. The film Holy Motors used their song “Come with Me Now” in the official trailer.

The band’s debut album Lunatic was released in 2012. Kongos’ single “I’m Only Joking”, from their album Lunatic topped various South African charts including all three of Tuks FM’s charts and received copious airtime on 5FM and on many other stations in South Africa. The music video for the song debuted on TV 5 on SABC 3 and was in rotation on MKTV. Their second single “Come with Me Now” was in rotation on both 5FM and Tuks FM. The song appeared on the 5FM Top 40 and the Tuks FM Top 30 charts.

In late October 2013, the band self-released Lunatic in the United States. In 2014, both “I’m Only Joking” and “Come with Me Now” began receiving noticeable exposure in the United States, gaining momentum in airplay on radio and being featured in television commercials there. As a result, the band was signed by Epic Records in late January 2014 and the band re-releasedLunatic. “Come with Me Now” has sold more than 70,000 copies as of March 2014.

Come With Me Now

Come with Me Now” is a song by South African band Kongos. Initially released in 2011 as single from their album Lunatic, “Come with Me Now” found commercial success in the United States in 2014, eventually peaking at number one on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart and becoming their first charting single in the United States.

In 2011, Kongos released their album Lunatic, which featured “Come with Me Now” which was released as a single. With the band performing the song live while opening for American band Linkin Park in South Africa, “Come with Me Now” was considered a fan favorite there though it initially struggled to find an audience in the United States. The band admitted that when “it didn’t seem like things were getting along we really lost heart – we were ready to move on to new material”

“Come with Me Now” has been described by Billboard as an “accordion-tinged” rock song. Members of the band themselves say that the song is heavily influenced by Kwaito music, which is described as being a blend of South African jazztownship pop, and Western house music

Come With Me Now – Johnny Kongos

Come with me now
Come with me now

Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna take you down
Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna show you how

Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna take you down
Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna show you how

Afraid to lose control
And caught up in this world
I’ve wasted time, I’ve wasted breath
I think I’ve thought myself to death

I was born without this fear
Now only this seems clear
I need to move, I need to fight
I need to lose myself tonight

Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna take you down
Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna show you how

I think with my heart and I move with my head
I open my mouth and it’s something I’ve read
I stood at this door before, I’m told
But a part of me knows that I’m growing too old

Confused what I thought with something I felt
Confuse what I feel with something that’s real
I tried to sell my soul last night
Funny, he wouldn’t even take a bite

Far away
I heard him say (Come with me now)
Don’t delay
I heard him say (Come with me now)

Far away
I heard him say (Come with me now)
Don’t delay
I heard him say (Come with me now)

Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna take you down
Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna show you how

Afraid to lose control
And caught up in this world
I’ve wasted time, I’ve wasted breath
I think I’ve thought myself to death

I was born without this fear
Now only this seems clear
I need to move, I need to fight
I need to lose myself tonight

Whoa, come with me now

Whoa, come with me now
I’m gonna take you down
Whoa, come with me now

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Who’s Behind the Door? ~ Zebra

zebraZebra is a Hard rock band founded in 1975 in New Orleans, Louisiana. It features Randy Jackson (guitar and vocals), Felix Hanemann (bass, keyboards and vocals) and Guy Gelso (drums and vocals). Their mainstream debut on Atlantic Records was in 1983 with their eponymous album, produced by Jack Douglas and highlighted by the singles “Tell Me What You Want” and “Who’s Behind The Door”. Zebra got their start on the US East Coast club circuit, frequently playing at clubs on Long Island, NY.

Zebra started their career by playing covers of Led Zeppelin, The Moody Blues and Rush songs; it was their early fans’ reaction to their Led Zeppelin renditions that helped convince the band to bring their act to New York. They had introduced their original material into their cover sets years before they were signed to Atlantic Records, including “The La La Song”, “Free” and “Bears” (originally entitled “The Bears are Hibernating”).

Zebra had been noticed by local colleges and even had some of their early original performances recorded by Long Island FM radio station WBAB, culminating in the inclusion of one of their songs on a release of “WBAB Homegrown Album”, which commemorated some of the station’s best local acts and performances culled from their on-air “Homegrown Hour” program.

The band continued to tour throughout the 1980s but put a temporary hold in the early 1990s after being dropped by Atlantic Records. Randy Jackson formed his solo band, Randy Jackson’s China Rain, and released its only album in the year 1993. Zebra finally reunited in 1997 and released Zebra IV in 2003, their first album of all-new material since 1986. A DVD of recent live performances, mostly from a show at the House of Blues in New Orleans, was released in the summer of 2007.

On July 10, 2010, during their 35th-anniversary performance at New Orleans’ Mahalia Jackson Theater, Zebra was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

On October 8, 2012, Zebra was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame.

In March 2013, Zebra performed on Cruise To The Edge, a concert cruise with notable progressive rock bands including Yes, Steve Hackett, U.K., Carl Palmer Band, Ambrosia, Saga, Nektar, Glass Hammer, and IOEarth. Zebra are currently second behind ZZ Top for longest running professional recording band with all original members from first album to present.

Who’s Behind the Door?

Often compared to Led Zeppelin, Randy Jackson is anything but. “Who’s Behind the Door?” is off of Zebra’s first album, Zebra.

Instead of a Page/Plant clone you geta spacey, time-warp tune featuring acoustic guitar, swirling keyboards and a welcome, otherworldly appeal. Though it peaked at only No. 61 on the Billboard pop charts, “Who’s Behind the Door?” has become part of the ’80s fabric simply because it is musically memorable and not particularly related to the stagnant artistic impulses that governed a great deal of the decade’s hard rock.


Who’s Behind the Door? – Randy Jackson

We sailed away
We walked 2 thousand miles
and then we slipped away
We looked so hard
But couldn’t seem to find just what
the world was for
Now we know
Just what the journey’s for

Looking out to the stars
Think about what you are
What do they think of you
Animals in their zoo
They haven’t got the time
Landing’s not on their minds
How do they have the nerve
We’re animals in preserve

They watch us all
They’re only making sure that we
don’t trip and fall
Now they look so hard
But they can’t tell us why they’re
here and just what for
Because they don’t know
Who opened up the door

How can we find out more
Who owns the keyless door
Where does the circle end
Who are the unwatched men
Where do we go from here
Faith is a fading fear
Life is a waiting room
I hope they don’t call me soon

How much more do you really
think you know than a flower
does about who’s behind the door!

Play 
  • Audio from the 1983 album, Zebra:

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