Magic Arrow ~ Timber Tibre

TimberTibreTimber Timbre is a Canadian music group, featuring Taylor Kirk, Simon Trottier, Mathieu Charbonneau and Olivier Fairfield. The moniker refers to an early series of recordings made in a timber-framed cabin set in the wooded outskirts of Bobcaygeon, Ontario.

Timber Timbre released two albums independently before releasing their self-titled album on Out of This Spark in January 2009. They were subsequently signed to Arts & Crafts, who re-released the album on June 30 in Canada and July 28 internationally. The album was named as a longlist nominee for the 2009 Polaris Music Prize on June 15, 2009, and was deemed album of the year by Eye Weekly.

The band’s song “Magic Arrow” was featured in the television show Breaking Bad, in the episode “Caballo Sin Nombre”, as well as in the TV series The Good Wife, in the episode “Bitcoin for Dummies”. “Black Water” features on the soundtrack for the 2012 comedy, For a Good Time, Call… Their song “Demon Host” was featured in the end credits to the 2013 film The Last Exorcism Part II.

The band’s fourth album, Creep On Creepin’ On, was released in April 2011. The album was named as one of ten shortlisted nominees for the 2011 Polaris Music Prize, and eventually lost to The Suburbs by Arcade Fire. In 2012, the band supported British folk singer Laura Marling on her UK tour and Canadian singer Feist on her tour of America.

The band’s fifth record, Hot Dreams, was released April 1, 2014. The album was a shortlisted nominee for the 2014 Polaris Music Prize.  but eventually lost to Tanya Tagaq’s Animism.

Timber Timbre’s sound has been described as “an aesthetic rooted in swampy, ragged blues” and “beautifully restrained blues from an alternate universe”, which creates an atmosphere that is cinematic and spooky.

Magic Arrow

The band’s song “Magic Arrow” was featured in the television show Breaking Bad, in the episode “Caballo Sin Nombre”, as well as in the TV series The Good Wife, in the episode “Bitcoin for Dummies”.


Magic Arrow – Taylor Kirk

Mystic palm, gem and tarot
A few escape your magic arrow
I saw you reel them in for miles
Each captivated crooked smile
And you know you can heal them all
Your double diamond disposition
Refractions of your center prism
Your magic arrow flies precision

And you saw it from that vantage point
Perimeter scratched on the nation’s native hide
And we saw those christian clippers glide
Over white caps and white sails hide
Over white knuckles
And I was fine till I saw the pale horse ride
And open up it’s gape across the ocean floor
You were fine till you saw the white rider take
And take some more

Our mother’s milk double faro
A few escape your magic arrow
And with a Christ as bayonet
Oh you siphoned off the hellion’s threats
And even in your ghastly visions
Your magic arrow flies precision
Whistles fly like a boiling potion
Charges like a locomotive

And you saw it from that vantage point
Perimeter scratched on the nation’s native hide
And we saw those christian clippers glide
Over white caps and white sails and hide
Over white knuckles
And you were fine till you saw the pale horse ride
Open up it’s gape across the ocean floor
You were fine till you saw the white rider take
And take some more

  • Audio from the 2009 album, Timber Timbre:

Timber Tibre album

Play Magic Arrow - by Timber Tibre

It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) ~ Bob Dylan

bob-dylanBob Dylan is an American singer-songwriter, author, poet, and disc jockey who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. Much of Dylan’s most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became an informal chronicler and a reluctant figurehead of American unrest. A number of his songs, such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin'”, became anthems of the anti-war and civil rights movements.

Dylan’s early lyrics incorporated politics, social commentary, philosophy and literary influences, defying existing pop music conventions and appealing widely to the counterculture. While expanding and personalizing musical styles, he has shown steadfast devotion to many traditions of American song, from folk and country/blues to gospel, rock and roll and rockabilly, to English, Scottish and Irish folk music, and even jazz and swing.

It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)

It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” is a song written and performed by Bob Dylan and first released on his 1965 album, Bringing It All Back Home. It was written in the summer of 1964, first performed live on October 10, 1964, and recorded on January 15, 1965. Described by Dylan biographer Howard Sounes as a “grim masterpiece,” the song features some of Dylan’s most memorable lyrical images. Among the well-known lines sung in the song are “Money doesn’t talk, it swears,” “Although the masters make the rules, for the wise men and the fools” and “But even the president of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked.” The lyrics express Dylan’s anger at hypocrisy, commercialism, consumerism, warmongers and contemporary American culture, but unlike his earlier protest songs, “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” does not express optimism in the possibility of political solutions.

Dylan has stated that “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” is one of his songs that means the most to him, and he has played the song often in live concerts.

Dylan wrote “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” in the summer of 1964. Although he was prepared to take his time developing the song, as he did with “Mr. Tambourine Man”, he finished it in time for inclusion on the Bringing It All Back Home album, which was recorded in January 1965. Dylan first performed “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” live on October 10, 1964 at Philadelphia Town Hall. The version included on Bringing It All Back Home was recorded on January 15, 1965, the same day that the other three songs on side 2 of the album (“Mr. Tambourine Man”, “Gates of Eden” and “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue”) were recorded, with Tom Wilson in the role of producer.  It was long thought that each of the four songs that make up side 2 of Bringing It All Back Home were recorded in one long take.  However, there was actually one false take of “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)”.

Dylan biographer Howard Sounes described “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” as a “grim masterpiece.”   The only accompaniment is Dylan’s guitar, playing folk-blues riffs and up and down chord progressions.   Author Sean Wilentz has noted that the song’s chord structure is similar to that used by the Everly Brothers’ in their hit recording of “Wake Up Little Susie”.  The lyrics of “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” express Dylan’s anger at hypocrisy, commercialism, consumerism, warmongers and contemporary American culture.  In his book Bob Dylan, Performing Artist, author Paul Williams has suggested that the song addresses “the possibility that the most important (and least articulated) political issue of our times is that we are all being fed a false picture of reality, and it’s coming at us from every direction.”  Williams goes on to say that the song successfully paints a portrait of an “alienated individual identifying the characteristics of the world around him and thus declaring his freedom from its ‘rules’.”  As such, a major target in the song is the old, established concepts which give a false picture of reality and hinder new worldviews from being accepted.

While it shares a sense of prevailing entropy with the previous song on the album, “Gates of Eden”, the critique in “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” is more direct and less allusive.  Author Michael Gray has commented that although the vitriol Dylan unleashes towards his targets is similar to his earlier political protest songs, “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” is a transitionary song in that it does not express optimism in the possibility of political solutions.

Instead, Dylan sings in a new prophetic voice that would later become his trademark. However, with the political pessimism comes a more poetic vision than in his earlier protest songs, along with a more complex figurative language.  Howard Sounes notes that the song features some of Dylan’s most memorable images.  The opening lines begin the song’s torrent of apocalyptic images:

Darkness at the break of noon
Shadows even the silver spoon
The handmade blade, the child’s balloon
Eclipses both the sun and moon
To understand you know too soon
There is no sense in trying

This opening echoes the Book of Ecclesiastes, where the author states (1:17) “I observed all deeds beneath the sun, and behold all is futile.  There are echoes of Ecclesiastes throughout the song. Another example is:

The masters make the rules
For the wise man and the fools.

The author of Ecclesiastes laments (2:15–16) “The fate of the fool will befall me also; to what advantage, then, have I become wise? But I come to the conclusion that this, too, was futility, because the wise man and the fool are both forgotten. The wise man dies, just like the fool.”

One of the most famous lines from the song reminds listeners that even the most powerful people will ultimately be judged:

But even the president of the United States
Sometimes must have to stand naked

These lines seemed particularly prescient when Dylan performed the song on his 1974 tour with The Band, a few months before Richard Nixon’s resignation as a result of the Watergate crisis. The final lines are also powerful:

And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
But it’s alright, Ma, it’s life and life only

Dylan has cited “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” as one of his songs that means the most to him.  In 1980 he stated that “I don’t think I could sit down now and write ‘It’s Alright, Ma’ again. I wouldn’t even know where to begin, but I can still sing it.” In 1997, Dylan told The New York Times, “I’ve written some songs that I look at, and they just give me a sense of awe. Stuff like, ‘It’s Alright, Ma,’ just the alliteration in that blows me away.”

In a 2005 reader’s poll reported in Mojo, “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” was listed as the #8 all-time greatest Bob Dylan song, and a similar poll of artists ranked the song #21. In 2002, Uncut listed it as the #5 all-time Dylan song.

It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) – Bob Dylan

Darkness at the break of noon
Shadows even the silver spoon
The handmade blade, the child’s balloon
Eclipses both the sun and moon
To understand you know too soon
There is no sense in trying.

Pointed threats, they bluff with scorn
Suicide remarks are torn
From the fools gold mouthpiece
The hollow horn plays wasted words
Proved to warn
That he not busy being born
Is busy dying.

Temptation’s page flies out the door
You follow, find yourself at war
Watch waterfalls of pity roar
You feel to moan but unlike before
You discover
That you’d just be
One more person crying.

So don’t fear if you hear
A foreign sound to you ear
It’s alright, Ma, I’m only sighing.

As some warn victory, some downfall
Private reasons great or small
Can be seen in the eyes of those that call
To make all that should be killed to crawl
While others say don’t hate nothing at all
Except hatred.

Disillusioned words like bullets bark
As human gods aim for their marks
Made everything from toy guns that sparks
To flesh-colored Christs that glow in the dark
It’s easy to see without looking too far
That not much
Is really sacred.

While preachers preach of evil fates
Teachers teach that knowledge waits
Can lead to hundred-dollar plates
Goodness hides behind its gates
But even the President of the United States
Sometimes must have
To stand naked.

An’ though the rules of the road have been lodged
It’s only people’s games that you got to dodge
And it’s alright, Ma, I can make it.

Advertising signs that con you
Into thinking you’re the one
That can do what’s never been done
That can win what’s never been won
Meantime life outside goes on
All around you.

You loose yourself, you reappear
You suddenly find you got nothing to fear
Alone you stand without nobody near
When a trembling distant voice, unclear
Startles your sleeping ears to hear
That somebody thinks
They really found you.

A question in your nerves is lit
Yet you know there is no answer fit to satisfy
Insure you not to quit
To keep it in your mind and not forget
That it is not he or she or them or it
That you belong to.

Although the masters make the rules
For the wise men and the fools
I got nothing, Ma, to live up to.

For them that must obey authority
That they do not respect in any degree
Who despite their jobs, their destinies
Speak jealously of them that are free
Cultivate their flowers to be
Nothing more than something
They invest in.

While some on principles baptized
To strict party platforms ties
Social clubs in drag disguise
Outsiders they can freely criticize
Tell nothing except who to idolize
And then say God Bless him.

While one who sings with his tongue on fire
Gargles in the rat race choir
Bent out of shape from society’s pliers
Cares not to come up any higher
But rather get you down in the hole
That he’s in.

But I mean no harm nor put fault
On anyone that lives in a vault
But it’s alright, Ma, if I can’t please him.

Old lady judges, watch people in pairs
Limited in sex, they dare
To push fake morals, insult and stare
While money doesn’t talk, it swears
Obscenity, who really cares
Propaganda, all is phony.

While them that defend what they cannot see
With a killer’s pride, security
It blows the minds most bitterly
For them that think death’s honesty
Won’t fall upon them naturally
Life sometimes
Must get lonely.

My eyes collide head-on with stuffed graveyards
False gods, I scuff
At pettiness which plays so rough
Walk upside-down inside handcuffs
Kick my legs to crash it off
Say okay, I have had enough
What else can you show me ?

And if my thought-dreams could been seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
But it’s alright, Ma, it’s life, and life only.

  • Audio from the 1965 album, Bringing It All Back Home:

Bob_Dylan_-_Bringing_It_All_Back_Home

Play It's Alright - by Bob Dylan

Counting Blue Cars ~ Dishwalla

downloadDishwalla is an American alternative rock band. The band’s name comes from an Hindi term for a person providing cable television to a neighborhood. In a Vox interview, Rodney claimed the band took the name out of a Wired magazine article.

Dishwalla, which emerged out of the early stages of post-grunge, is composed of J.R. Richards (vocals), Scot Alexander (bass), Rodney Browning (guitar), Jim Wood (keyboards), and George Pendergast (drums). They spent the mid-’90s touring with the likes of Sheryl Crow, Blind Melon, and the Goo Goo Dolls in support of Pet Your Friends. Prior to making a second album, the band was caught in the middle of the Polygram/Universal merger and such a move left Dishwalla pondering what to do next. Their second album, “And You Think You Know What Life’s About”, was released in 1998; promotion and sales were lackluster due to label downsizing. Dishwalla’s time with A&M was short lived and exhausting because of such corporate behavior, but they stuck it out to contribute their cover version of “Policy of Truth” for the Depeche Mode tribute album “For the Masses”. By the new millennium, Dishwalla left behind major-market America for a third album. They signed with Immergent while Pendergrast left the band. Pete Maloney, a drummer picked up on the 1998 tour, resumed percussion duties. In 2002, Dishwalla appeared sound and sane, issuing the experimental third album “Opaline”. A self-titled album followed in 2005.

Counting Blue Cars

Counting Blue Cars” is a song by the alternative rock band Dishwalla that appears on their 1995 album Pet Your Friends. It was Dishwalla’s only hit song, making it onto the Billboard Hot 100 and the Top 40 in 1996. It is mostly about wanting to know about God’s ambitions and wanting to ensure one’s eternal destiny. The song is instantly recognizable by the line in the chorus, “Tell me all your thoughts on God (cause I’d really like to meet her).”

Counting Blue Cars – Kolanek

Must of been mid afternoon
I could tell by how far the child’s shadow stretched out and
He walked with a purpose
In his sneakers, down the street
He had, many questions
Like children often do
He said,
Tell me all your thoughts on God?
Tell me am I very far?

Must of been late afternoon
On our way the sun broke free of the clouds
We count only blue cars
Skip the cracks, in the street
And ask many questions
Like children often do
We said,
Tell me all your thoughts on God?
‘Cause I would really like to meet her.
And ask her why we’re who we are.
Tell me all your thoughts on God,
Cause I am on my way to see her.
So tell me am I very far –
Am I very far now?

Its getting cold picked up the pace
How our shoes make hard noises in this place
Our clothes are stained
We pass many, cross eyed people
And ask many questions
Like children often do

Tell me all your thoughts on God?
‘Cause I would really like to meet her.
And ask her why we’re who we are.
Tell me all your thoughts on God?
‘Cause I am on my way to see her.
So tell me am I very far?
Am I very far now
Am I very far now
Am I very far now

  • Album from the 1995 album, Pet Your Friends:

Pet_Your_Friends_Album_Cover

Play Counting Blue Cars - by Dishwalla

Boulevard of Broken Dreams – Green Day

green-dayIn 1987, 14 year old friends Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt formed a band called Sweet Children. The first Sweet Children show took place on October 17, 1987, at Rod’s Hickory Pit in Vallejo, California where Armstrong’s mother was working. In 1988, Armstrong and Dirnt began working with former Isocracy drummer, John Kiffmeyer (also known as Al Sobrante). Kiffmeyer served as both the bands drummer and business manager, handling the booking of shows and helping the band establish a fan base.

Larry Livermore, owner of Lookout! Records, saw the band play an early show and signed them to his label. In 1989 they recorded their first EP, 1,000 Hours. Before 1,000 Hours was released, the band dropped the name Sweet Children, according to Livermore this was done in order to avoid confusion with another local band Sweet Baby. The band adopted the name Green Day, allegedly due to their fondness of marijuana.

Boulevard of Broken Dreams

Boulevard of Broken Dreams” is a song by American punk rock band Green Day, recorded for their seventh studio album American Idiot (2004). Reprise Records released “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” as the second single from American Idiot. The song’s lyrics were written by lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong, and composed by the band. Production was handled by Rob Cavallo and Green Day. “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” remains one of Green Day’s signature songs.

The song speaks from the point of view of American Idiot‍ ’​s main character, Jesus of Suburbia, and is a moderate midtempo song characterized by somber and bleak lyrics. This is in contrast to the previous track on the album, “Holiday”, which illustrates Jesus of Suburbia’s high of being in The City. MTV’s Green Day Makes a Video described “Holiday” as a party, and “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” as the subsequent hangover.

It was ranked the number one on Rolling Stone‍ ’​s Reader’s Choice: Singles of the Decade list in 2009 and number 65 on the 100 Best Songs of the Decade list in the same year. As of 2010, it has sold 2,084,000 copies in the United States,.  The single peaked at number two in the United States, making it Green Day’s most successful song. The song was the ninth biggest selling single of the 2000-2009 decade with worldwide sales exceeding 5 million copies. “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” won the Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

“Boulevard of Broken Dreams” was written during a respite from pre-production on what would become the band’s seventh album, American Idiot. Hoping to clear his head and develop new ideas for songs, Green Day frontman Billie Joe Armstrong traveled to New York City alone for a few weeks, renting a small loft in the East Village of Manhattan. He spent much of this time taking long walks and participating in jam sessions in the basement of Hi-Fi, a bar in Manhattan. He began socializing with songwriters Ryan Adams and Jesse Malin.

Armstrong wrote the song about his time in New York City, about “feeling alone” and trying to take power from that fact. Armstrong felt the song fit nicely with the album’s storyline, which is about “going away and getting the hell out, while at the same time fighting their own inner demons.”  The song’s title is from a James Dean poster in which he is walking through New York with an overcoat on.

Boulevard of Broken Dreams – Armstrong

I walk a lonely road
The only one that I have ever known
Don’t know where it goes
But it’s home to me and I walk alone

I walk this empty street
On the Boulevard of Broken Dreams
Where the city sleeps
and I’m the only one and I walk alone

I walk alone
I walk alone

I walk alone
I walk a…

My shadow’s the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart’s the only thing that’s beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
‘Til then I walk alone

Ah-ah, Ah-ah, Ah-ah, Aaah-ah,
Ah-ah, Ah-ah, Ah-ah

I’m walking down the line
That divides me somewhere in my mind
On the border line
Of the edge and where I walk alone

Read between the lines
What’s fucked up and everything’s alright
Check my vital signs
To know I’m still alive and I walk alone

I walk alone
I walk alone

I walk alone
I walk a…

My shadow’s the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart’s the only thing that’s beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
‘Til then I walk alone

Ah-ah, Ah-ah, Ah-ah, Aaah-ah
Ah-ah, Ah-ah

I walk alone
I walk a…

I walk this empty street
On the Boulevard of Broken Dreams
Where the city sleeps
And I’m the only one and I walk a…

My shadow’s the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart’s the only thing that’s beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
‘Til then I walk alone…

  • Audio from the 2004 album, American Idiot:

American-Idiot-GreenDay

Play Boulevard of Broken Dreams - by Green Day

 

Love Is ~ Rod Stewart

rod-stewartRoderick David “Rod” Stewart, CBE,  is a British rock singer-songwriter. Born and raised in London, he is of English and Scottish ancestry. Stewart is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold over 100 million records worldwide.

He has had six consecutive number one albums in the UK, and his tally of 62 UK hit singles includes 31 that reached the top 10, six of which gained the number one position. He has had 16 top ten singles in the US, with four reaching number one on the Billboard Hot 100. In 2007, he received a CBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music.

With his distinctive raspy singing voice, Stewart came to prominence in the late 1960s and early 1970s with The Jeff Beck Group and then with Faces, though his music career had begun in 1962 when he took up busking with a harmonica. In October 1963 he joined the Dimensions as a harmonica player and part-time vocalist, then in 1964 he joined Long John Baldry and the All Stars. Later, in August 1964, he also signed a solo contract, releasing his first solo single, “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”, in October of the same year. He maintained a solo career alongside a group career, releasing his debut solo album An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down (US: The Rod Stewart Album), in 1969. His early albums were a fusion of rock, folk music, soul music and R&B. His aggressive blues work with The Jeff Beck Group and the Faces influenced heavy metal genres.  From the late 1970s through the 1990s, Stewart’s music often took on a new wave or soft rock/middle-of-the-road quality, and in the early 2000s he released a series of successful albums interpreting the Great American Songbook.

In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked him the 17th most successful artist on the “Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists”. A Grammy and Brit Award recipient, he was voted at No. 33 in Q Magazine’s list of the top 100 Greatest Singers of all time, and No. 59 on Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Singers of all time.  As a solo artist, Stewart was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2006 and was inducted a second time into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012, as a member of the Faces.

Love Is

Love Is” is the first song and lead single on Another Country, the twenty-ninth studio album by British singer-songwriter Rod Stewart. It was released on 23 October 2015 through Capitol Records. It was produced by Stewart and Kevin Savigar.

Love Is – Rod Stewart

And so you come to me with your questions
On a subject on which I’m well-versed
Though I’m still as dumbfounded as the first time I found her
It’s either a blessing or a curse
Although I cannot offer solutions
It would be reckless of me to try
Cause it’s mystified man ever since time began
But hold on to your hat and I’ll try

[Chorus]
Love is like a burning arrow
It can pierce the coldest heart
Love is warm, love is patient
And the craziest thing you’ll ever start
All right

I recall when I was a young man
A day I’m never allowed to forget
There was a girl that I met who I dreamed I would wed
Forever I lodged in it, so hot
She said “you gotta stop worrying about the future”
“You know we’re far too young for that”
“I wanna spread my wings like a willow in the spring”
I never saw her pretty face again

[Chorus]
Love is life, love is yearning
It does not boast, but speaks the truth
Love is fair and knows no boundaries
And the craziest thing you’ll ever do
Oh, yeah

I wish you well in all of your travels
And may you find what you’re searching for
It’ll hit you like thunder when you find one another
And stay in your heart forevermore

[Chorus]
Love is like a four-leaf clover
Hard to find and hold onto
Love is blind, love is tender
And the craziest thing you’ll ever do
So crazy

  • Audio from the 2015 album, Another Country:

another-country-album

Play Love Is - by Rod Stewart

Doomed ~ Brent Amaker and the Rodeo

141028570_640Brent Amaker and the Rodeo is an American Country Western band from Seattle, Washington consisting of Brent Amaker, Tiny Dancer, Sugar McGuinn, Ben Strehle, and Bryan Crawford.

Brent Amaker and the Rodeo formed in Seattle, Washington, in 2005. The band’s image recalls influential country musician Johnny Cash, ‘The Man in Black’, as they dress head-to-toe in black with matching Stetson hats and cowboy boots. They are billed as influenced by art rock performers Devo and glam rock’s David Bowie.

Much emphasis is put into the band’s image as evidenced by a large collection of photos and music videos done by the band, fans, and photographers and videographers. The Rodeo have a cinematic quality and are often put in context of spaghetti western films made by Sergio Leone and Ennio Morricone.

Their concerts often feature a dancing girl from local burlesque troupes and a phenomenon only known as the “Whiskey Baptism” where Amaker welcomes new fans into the “Church of the Rodeo” by pouring shots of liquor into their mouths.

Recently, they have been gaining notoriety from their cover of “Pocket Calculator” by German electro-pioneers Kraftwerk.

They also performed in the indie slasher film “Punch” directed by Jay Cynik. Cynik also wrote a comic book based on the exploits of the band on tour called “Mescal de la Muerte.” Illustrated by Portland, Oregon artist, Simon Young, the graphic adult novel was included in their 2010 release “Please Stand By.

Doomed

The best country music expresses profound things in the commonest of terms, and these postmodern cowpokes do a decent job approaching that. “In the end/ We’re all doomed/ Even if you’re living/ On the moon” on “Doomed” comes off as just careless rather than an endearingly glib take on mortality. But based on the hooting and hollering from the band during the interlude before the last chorus, that’s not their main concern. If country music really is for the everyman, why shouldn’t songs about the apocalypse two-step in on nursery-rhyme couplets? —  J. Arthur Bloom – Tiny Mix Tapes

Doomed was featured in the closing song of Showtime’s series finale of Weeds on September 26, 2011.

In the end We’re all doomed
Even if your livin’ on the moon
We’re all doomed.

Super volcano near
Even if we get out of here
We’re all doomed.
We’re doomed.

Enjoy your stay while you’re here
We’re Doomed.

So take this time to pass some love around
And tell your friends before they’re dead
Love is the only legacy you leave behind
Love is the only legacy you leave behind
And we’re all doomed

In the end We’re all doomed (yee haw)
Even if your livin’ on the moon
We’re all doomed.

How ’bout the big line across the sky
If it’s here we’re gonna die
Everyone dies

So take this time to pass some love around
And tell your friends before they’re dead
Love is the only legacy you leave behind
Love is the only legacy you leave behind (yes it is)
Love is the only legacy you leave behind
And we’re all doomed

  • Audio from the 2010 album, Please Stand By:
Play Doomed - by Brent Amaker and the Rodeo

The Rodeo Song ~ Garry Lee and the Showdown

The-Rodeo-Song-By-ShowdownGarry Lee and the Showdown were a country band from Armpit, Alberta, Canada.

A true collaboration of Alberta talent at its finest, Showdown began as a barn band in Armpit, Alberta in the late 70’s when Garry Lee Berthold would whistle while milking Bessie. His neighbor Charles Holly heard the blissful dairy-duties and before long, the two were jamming with their little animal friends. Deciding it would be best if their husbands simply abandoned farm life, Mrs Holly and Berthold packed up the kids and hubbies and headed to town. Arriving at the bustling metropolis of Medicine Hat, the two quickly took to fiddles and geetars. Low and behold … they were good. So good in fact they moved to the big city – Leduc. There, they attracted the attention of more farmers, fellow banjo and guitarist Kelly La Rocque and drummer Paul McLellan. When they decided to go on the road, Berthold decided to shorten his name to Garry Lee.

A cult following soon developed, unable to get enough of the group’s pure magnetism on stage. Two-stepping … this silly dance then that one … the boys were hot. They decided corporate types were never going to catch on to their brand of country music mixed with dry prairie humor, so they threw a couple of bags in their pickups and headed for the studios. Eventually agreeing to let Garry’s German Shephard in the building, the guys came out of Damon Studios in the spring of 1980 with what is quite honestly one of the most cleverly written, witty, ground-breaking, slickest sounding country records to ever come out of Canada, WELCOME TO THE RODEO. With Gaye Delorme’s song, “The Rodeo Song”, the band gained instant notoriety. Though the album jacket praises the song for being a future classic, right below it is a warning for radio DJ’s not to play it. Read the lyrics below and you’ll know why …..

The Rodeo Song

Originally written by Gaye Delorme, Garry Lee and the Showdown were the ones to make it famous in their 1980 album, “Welcome to the Rodeo”.  For obvious reasons, it would never receive radio air play, so its popularity was spread mainly through clubs and other venues.

The Rodeo Song – Gaye Delorme

Well it’s 40 below and I don’t give a fuck
Got a heater in my truck and I’m off to the rodeo
And it’s allemande left and allemande right
Come on ya fuckin’ dummy get your right step right
Get off the stage ya god damn goof, get off

piss me off, fuckin’ jerk, get on my nerves

Well here comes Johnny with his pecker in his hand
He’s a one ball man and he’s off to the rodeo
And it’s allemande left and allemande right
Come on ya fuckin’ dummy get your right step right
Get off the stage ya god damn goof, get off

piss me off, fuckin’ jerk, get on my nerves

Well it’s 40 below and I aint got a truck
and I dont give a fuck cause I’m off to the rodeo
And it’s allemande left and allemande right
Come on ya fuckin’ dummy get your right step right
Get off the stage ya god damn goof, get off

piss me off, fuckin’ jerk, get on my nerves

Well here comes Johnny with his pecker in his hand
He’s a one ball man and he’s off to the rodeo
And it’s allemande left and allemande right
Come on ya fuckin’ dummy get your right step right
Get off the stage ya god damn goof, get off

piss me off, fuckin’ jerks, get on my nerves

  • Audio from the 1994 album, The Rodeo Song “The Original Hit”:

showdown

Play The Rodeo Song - by Garry Lee and the Showdown
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